Education planning and administration handbook

Last changed: 15 March 2019

Policy, rules and guidelines for first-cycle and second-cycle education at SLU.

Click on the heading you want to read more, if you go directly to the chapter further down the page. At the bottom there are attachments and notes.

The education manual is also available as pdf. The most important changes are described in the decision document. Where there are official translations of laws, these are cited, in other cases, the translation of legal texts is SLU's own.

1. Introduction

1.1 Purpose of the handbook, target group and demarcation
1.2 Content and outline
1.3 Abbreviations and recurring concepts

2. Educational framework

2.1 Legal conditions
2.2 Financial conditions
2.3 Organisational conditions
2.4 Academic year and semester dates
2.5 Subject, main field of study, disciplinary domain

3. Students and student support

3.1 Starting points
3.2 Teaching environments
3.3 Equal opportunities
3.4 Study and career guidance
3.5 Study with a disability
3.6 Student copyright
3.7 Student insurance
3.8 Student costs and reimbursements
3.9 Tuition fees
3.10 Tuition fee refunds
3.11 Student debt conditions
3.12 Scholarships
3.13 Approved leave from studies and non-completion
3.14 Student influence
3.15 Complaint procedures
3.16 Appeal a decision

4. Teachers and examiners

4.1 Starting points
4.2 Educational development
4.3 University teacher with merit-based salary increment (“Excellent teacher”)
4.4 Degree-awarding powers at department level
4.5 Examiner
4.6 Competence requirements for examiners
4.7 Change of examiner
4.8 Teacher copyright
4.9 Staff liability issues

5. Quality assurance

5.1 Starting points
5.2 Course evaluations
5.3 Programme evaluations
5.4. Student welfare follow-up
5.5 Dialogues on quality

6. Course syllabus and course dates

6.1 Starting points
6.2 Course syllabus
6.3 Grading system
6.4 Course dates
6.5 Cancellation of a course
6.6 Course modules

7. Before and when a course starts

7.1 Early course information
7.2 Course date application
7.3 Course date admission
7.4 Start of a course
7.5 Course date registration
7.6 Non-completion of a course

8. Examinations (tests) and compulsory steps

8.1 Examinations (tests) and grading
8.2 Examination times, locations and registration
8.3 Rules for written examinations
8.4 Other types of examination (tests)
8.5 Compulsory steps
8.6 Special reasons
8.7 Grading decisions
8.8 Reporting results and documentation
8.9 Feedback and handing back written examinations
8.10 Alternative examination session
8.11 Renewed examination (retake session)
8.12 Renewed examination (retake session) limitations

9. Independent project (degree project)

9.1 Utgångspunkter
9.2 Kursplan
9.3 Arbetsplan
9.4 Organisation av genomförandet

10. Cheating and disciplinary measures

10.1 Cheating and plagiarism
10.2 Inform and prevent
10.3 Discover and intervene
10.4 Disciplinary measures

11. Programmes offered

11.1 Degree programme objectives and requirements at SLU
11.2 Dimension degree programmes
11.3 Propose a new degree programme
11.4 Phase out a degree programme

12. Programme syllabus and programme date

12.1 Programme syllabus
12.2 Programme date
12.3 Temporary freeze on admissions

13. Programme studies

13.1 Programme application (programme date)
13.2 Programme admission (programme date)
13.3 Programme registration (programme date)
13.4 Admission to latter parts of programmes
13.5 Approved leave from studies and non-completion of a programme
13.6 Changes to the range of courses offered within a programme
13.7 Programme director of studies

14. Credit transfer

15. External collaboration

15.1 External collaboration
15.2 External collaboration purpose and objectives
15.3 Education planning – external collaboration
15.4 External collaboration and student progression
15.5 External collaboration for good working life connections (teachers)
15.6 Follow-up

Bilageförteckning

Bilaga 1: SLU:s utbildningsorganisation
Bilaga 2: Årscykel för utbildningsplanering
Bilaga 3: Ämnen vid SLU inom utbildning på grundnivå och avancerad nivå
Bilaga 4: Arkivering av kursinformation
Bilaga 5: Gemensamma kursvärderingsfrågor (Evald)
Bilaga 6: Gemensamma kursvärderingsfrågor (Evald) för självständigt arbete (examensarbete)
Bilaga 7: Uppgifter som ska ingå i framsida och titelsida för självständigt arbete (examensarbete) vid SLU
Bilaga 8: Avpubliceringsprocess för pdf-fil som redan är publicerad i Epsilon
Bilaga 9: Process vid förändring av pdf-fil som redan är publicerad i Epsilon


1. Introduction

1.1 Purpose of the handbook, target group and demarcation
1.2 Content and outline
1.3 Abbreviations and recurring concepts

1.1 Purpose of the handbook, target group and demarcation

The general purpose of the handbook is to clarify the rights and obligations of students, teachers and other staff at SLU.

The handbook covers most issues concerning first-cycle and second-cycle education at SLU. Certain parts of SLU education is governed elsewhere, but described here. In other parts, the handbook acts as the governing document for SLU.

In addition, the handbook provides the reader with instructions and references.

However, please remember that the handbook does not apply to

  • contract education or contract education students
  • doctoral or research education

1.2 Content and outline

The chapters correspond to various aspects of SLU education, and each chapter’s subsections generally include a number of recurring subheadings: 

Important concepts
Terms and concepts which may need to be defined and explained.

Policy
SLU’s intention and purpose. Sometimes, other documents describing SLU objectives and strategies are referenced.

National regulations
Regulations that govern SLU operations and which apply to both students and employees. Statutes decided by the Riksdag and government (e.g. acts) take precedence over SLU’s internal rules. Therefore, these statutes are frequently referenced, both through direct quotes and comprehensive explanations of the legislative texts. If a statute is changed, it applies even if SLU’s internal documents have not been updated. If necessary, go to the source to check the latest version.

SLU rules
The handbook constitutes a governing document for internal rules concerning first-cycle and second-cycle education at SLU. In certain cases, these rules are decided in another document, which will then be referenced. If necessary, go to the source to check the latest version. At SLU, we sometimes use the term “guidelines” to mean the same as “rules”.

Who is responsible for what?
Division of responsibility for the work described in the section. SLU’s delegations of authority take precedence over the handbook in regard to delegated powers and division of responsibility between various bodies and functionaries. If a delegation of authority is changed, it applies even if SLU’s internal documents have not been updated. If necessary, go to the source to check the latest version. In addition to the university- and faculty-wide delegations of authority, the departments normally have internal divisions of responsibility for issues related to education.

Instructions
Information on how to carry out a task, step or measure. SLU normally follows recommendations from SUHF (the Association of Swedish Higher Education Institutions). However, these recommendations do not govern our operations, but must be included in an SLU decision in order to apply.

Links
Where applicable, we recommend additional information and in-depth reading in the form of links. These links often go to the SLU web.

The headings above cannot be found in every subsection, which might include other headings specific to a certain section. But this is the general structure.

Exceptions

The information in the handbook normally applies, but exceptions may be allowed if necessary. Exceptions are decided by the same authority that decided on the original regulation, but they can also be decided by another authority, mostly if there are circumstances beyond SLU’s control.

Links

Laws and other statutes (only in Swedish)
Rules for doctoral education
Rules for contract education (only in Swedish)

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1.3 Abbreviations and other recurring concepts

Abbreviations and concepts that occur in the handbook and in other contexts related to education at SLU:

Entry requirements – prior knowledge and other requirements necessary for a student to be eligible for a certain programme or course.

Canvas* – a learning platform that will be introduced at SLU during 2018/19 (also see Fronter).

Convertus* – a tool for translating course syllabuses from Swedish to English.

Dean – the head of an SLU faculty.

Delegation of authority – see section 2.3 Organisational conditions.

Exemption – individual exceptions to rules that generally apply.

Evald* – SLU’s system for electronic course evaluations at first-cycle and second-cycle level.

Faculty – umbrella term for organisational divisions led by a faculty board/dean. The faculties are responsible for the departments.

Faculty office – part of the university administration at SLU which supports and provides service for each faculty.

Faculty board – the highest decision-making body within a faculty.

Non-programme student – student who is not studying a programme.

Fronter* – a learning platform aimed to inform and communicate with the student during a specific course (also see Canvas).

Department – education, research and environmental monitoring and assessment are carried out at a number of departments (or equivalent). The head of department is responsible for operations. Every department belongs to at least one faculty.

KronoX* – system for booking rooms such as lecture halls, computer rooms and group rooms.

Ladok* – a national system for study documentation that includes registration, examination results and other compulsory information.

Equivalence assessment – a person who does not meet formal entry requirements may have other qualifications deemed to correspond to the listed requirements.

Moveon* – used for agreements, applications and administration concerning student exchange (at first- and second-cycle level) and teacher mobility.

NyA* – a national admissions system used for course and programme admissions at both first- and second-cycle level.

Head of department – head of an SLU department. The head of department is tasked and authorised by both the vice-chancellor and faculty board/dean.

Programme board (PN) – part of SLU’s educational organisation. See section 2.3 Organisational conditions and the SLU web: Educational organisation.

Degree programme student – student admitted to or who has begun studying a degree programme.

Programme director of studies (PSR) – part of SLU’s educational organisation. See section 13.7 Programme director of studies and the SLU web: Programme directors of studies.

Slukurs* – SLU’s database for documenting programmes, courses and course dates, both at first-, second-, third-cycle or preparatory level.

Slunik and course pages* – course information where all first- and second-cycle courses have their own section. Slunik information is displayed on the course page, the student or external web. Doctoral courses may also provide information through Slunik.

Student web* – the students’ internal web where they can find information or support regarding their studies.

Director of studies – the handbook includes the term department director of studies (or equivalent) (see section 2.3 Organisational conditions) to avoid confusion with programme director of studies (see section 13.7 Programme director of studies).

SUHF – the Association of Swedish Higher Education Institutions.

UHR – the Swedish Council for Higher Education is a public authority nationally tasked with promoting higher education. Among other things, UHR is responsible for admission and study information – studera.nu for information on higher education and antagning.se for course and programme applications.

UKÄ – the Swedish Higher Education Authority is a public authority which, among other things, reviews the quality of higher education and research and which monitors universities and higher education institutions regarding compliance with laws and regulations.

Division of Educational Affairs – part of the university administration at SLU which supports and provides service for students and teachers. See the SLU web: Division of Educational Affairs.

Exchange student – student who studies through an exchange programme. An incoming exchange student comes to SLU to carry out their exchange studies (at first- or second-cycle level) and counts as a degree programme student. Incoming students have access to programme courses during their exchange period. An outgoing exchange student is an SLU student who travels abroad to carry out their exchange studies in another country.

Urkund* – a plagiarism tracking system that SLU teachers have access to where all types of examination assignments and written assignments are checked against a large number of sources to discover possible plagiarism.

Board of Education (UN) – part of SLU’s educational organisation (https://internt.slu.se/en/support-services/education/education-at-bachelors-and-masters-level/local-statutes-and-organization/educational-bodies/21/).

Conditions – a decision made with certain conditions only applies if the listed conditions are met.

Annual cycle – SLU applies joint time frames for planning and decisions on the offered course and programmes. See 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning (only in Swedish).

*) Specific authorisation is required to use our educational support systems. Authorisation is given by the Division of Educational Affairs.

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2. Educational framework

2.1 Legal conditions
2.2 Financial conditions
2.3 Organisational conditions
2.4 Academic year and semester dates
2.5 Subject, main field of study, disciplinary domain

2.1 Legal conditions

National regulations

SLU is a public authority and operations are regulated by legislation and ordinances decided at national level. Below is a link to a list of some of the acts and ordinances most important to SLU.

“As the accountable authority, the Government shall establish higher education institutions for the provision of courses and study programmes based on scholarship or artistic practice and on proven experience [...]”.[1]

Courses and study programmes shall be provided at:[2]

  • first-cycle
  • second–cycle, and
  • third-cycle level.

Links

Laws and other statutes (only in Swedish)

2.2 Financial conditions

SLU rules at university level (step 1)

Reimbursement for the faculties

The SLU Board has decided on principles regarding the allocation of direct government funding by the board to the faculties for courses and programmes at first- and second-cycle level.[3] To sum up, the model is based on the following basic principles:

  • All programmes are divided into one of seven different categories based on subject matter.
  • Templates are used to divide each category into disciplinary domains.
  • Reimbursement for the various disciplinary domains is based on an increase of the reimbursement levels for higher education institutions under the Ministry of Education and Research.
  • Student volume is based on the number of FTEs (full-time equivalents) and predicted performance in APEs (annual performance equivalents).
  • Until further notice, decisions on resource allocation is made at programme group level.
  • According to a decision by the programme board, reimbursement for a programme group may reduced or increased by a maximum of 10 per cent.
  • Settlement will occur later in relation to the number of FTEs and APEs attained. See below.

Categories at this level:

  • Social science programmes
  • Mixed programmes focusing on social sciences
  • Mixed programmes focusing on natural sciences
  • Natural science/technology programmes
  • Design programmes
  • The Veterinary Nursing programme
  • The Veterinary Medicine programme
Settlement 

Settlement is based on the principle that a programme group gets paid for what it actually produces. This is regulated at the end of the year in the form of a settlement or increase of the actual number of FTEs and APEs during the year in question.[1]

The example below shows how the programme groups are paid in 2018 based on the following calculation:

 The APE forecast is set to the APEs during the last 12 months. However, in certain cases an estimate will be made for e.g. new programmes, programmes being developed or cancelled.

Settlement occurs at programme group level and in relation to the results for the year in question. The following calculation is used:

 If a programme group’s actual number of students (based on the outcome data) is fewer than the number of students they have been paid for, they will have to pay back funds corresponding to the difference. A programme group with an actual number of students larger than the number they were paid for will be given funding to cover the difference, if possible.

Since study administrative costs have already been paid for the FTE assignment, an amount corresponding to these costs will be excepted from the settlement amount.

Joint objectives

Funding of certain hared resources can be done using joint funds at university level. It mostly pplies to infrastructure that is available to all SLU students. In this case, it primarily means strategic development funds and reimbursement for teaching premises in cases where these are not paid for using user charges.

Who is responsible for what?

  • The Board of Education proposes an allocation of funds for the programme boards as well as for joint objectives.
  • The board decides on the allocation of funds for joint objectives and for the faculties. The faculty boards are then tasked with allocating funds further in accordance with the proposals from the programme boards.

SLU rules at faculty level (step 2)

Reimbursement for the departments
  • Reimbursement for courses consists of the following:
    • basic reimbursement (SEK/credit) – the same for all courses;
    • variable, performance-based reimbursement (SEK/FTE) dependent on the reimbursement category.
  • Reimbursement categories are based on the type of teaching. The objectives in the course syllabus act as starting points. The programme board must take an active standpoint and make a qualified assessment. Resource-based categorisation is ultimately an expression of the programme board’s ambitions for each course within the given resource frame.
  • The programme board decides the number of reimbursement levels as well as the reimbursement for each level.[5]
  • The number of students is calculated based on the number of planned and assigned FTEs, which refers to a combination of the forecast and allocation for the budget year in question. To level out differences between years, the forecast may have to be based on up to three years of history.
  • The programme boards have the opportunity to create incentives and make other adjustments to course reimbursement.
  • Each programme board must stay within the resource framework stated in the SLU Board’s funding allocation decision. Within this frame, the programme boards are allowed to make certain redistributions between their programme groups. After a decision by the programme board, reimbursement for a programme group may be reduced or increased by a maximum of 10 per cent.
  • For courses bought from another higher education institution, allocation must be at the same level as the costs SLU is paying the contractor. This applies on the condition that the programme board has decided to purchase the course.
  • Reimbursement for independent projects (degree projects) is managed outside the joint model. It is possible to partly fund supervision of degree projects at second–cycle level with funds from the reporting area research and third-cycle education.
  • The Equine Science programme and supplementary education for foreign veterinary surgeons (Tu-vet) are not included in the joint model for calculating course reimbursement. SLU receives targeted funding for these programmes.

 Component

 Calculating reimbursement for courses

 Basic reimbursement

Number of credits * X SEK.[6]

 Performance
 reimbursement

 The number of full-time equivalents (FTEs) * variable reimbursement in accordance with the course’s resource-based categorisation described below. The level is decided by the programme board.

 Incentive payments

 Supplements, or, in certain cases, deductions, as described below.
 Where appropriate, the programme board decides on the appropriate action.

 

Reimbursement category

Qualitative description for resource-based categorisation of courses. The programme board decides the amount of reimbursement levels as well as the reimbursement for each level.[7]

1

Typical courses can be described as “self-study courses” with a minimal amount of exercises led by teachers. Most teaching is done in front of a “whole class”. The course includes general skills training.

2

Typical courses can be described as “seminar courses” with a relatively high number of lectures** and a moderate amount of exercises led by teachers*. Most teaching is done in front of a combination of a “whole class” and relatively large groups. As stated in the course syllabus, the course includes general skills
training
.

3

Typical courses can be described as courses combining theory and application through lectures** and an average amount of exercises led by teachers*. Study visits and field exercises may also be included. Most teaching is done in front of a combination of a “whole class” and various exercise groups. As stated in the
course syllabus, general skills training is an important part of the course
.

4

Typical courses can be described as “lab courses” with a relatively high amount of exercises led by teachers*. Study visits and field exercises may also be included. Most teaching is done in front of lab groups, but lectures** and other “whole class” or large group activities are also included. As stated in the course syllabus,
general skills training is a considerable part of the course, and is important for the students’ future professional life
.

5

Typical courses can be described as intensive with a very substantial amount of exercises led by teachers*, e.g. “studio courses”. Field exercises and study visits may also be included. Most teaching is done in front of small groups, but lectures** and other “whole class” or large group activities are also included. As stated in the course syllabus, general skills training is the biggest part of the course, and is important for the students’ future professional life.

6

Typical courses can be described as intensive with the highest number of exercises led by teachers. Field exercises and study visits may also be included. Most teaching is done in front of very small groups, but large group activities are also included. As stated in the course syllabus, general skills training is the biggest part of the course, and is important for the students’ future professional life.

7

The programme board proportions resource allocation for specific courses not included in the replacement categories listed above. Exceptions must be reported to the Board of Education and be justified in the same manner as the programme boards do. This normally includes so-called clinic rotation courses within the Veterinary Medicine programme.

* Exercise time or “module activity” are used as umbrella terms for teaching dependent on the number of students taking a course, i.e. the number of groups normally increase if the number of students increases. Here, the concepts are used to include a number of various forms of teaching with a high degree of student-teacher interactivity. “Module activities” include exercises, seminars, excursions, field exercises, laboratory sessions, workshops, design studios and clinical training.

** Lectures or “whole course activity” are used as umbrella terms for teaching not dependent on the number of students taking a course. Lectures, lessons and other equivalents are considered whole course activities.

Distance learning courses are included in the joint allocation model, even if the category descriptions above have their starting point in campus-based courses.

Incentive payments

Incentive payment objectives and other specific supplements or deductions:

  • Courses year 1 (at first-cycle level) – recurring supplements;
  • New course or changed design of an existing course – temporary supplement;
  • Increased joint studies between programmes or department cooperation – temporary supplement;
  • Changed resource-based categorisation or cancellation of a course – temporary supplement;
  • Structure support at course level – temporary supplement;
  • Course with several course dates per academic year – recurring deduction;
  • Course carried out in parallel and which shares important components with another course – recurring deduction;
  • Course with a decision to cancel a course date – temporary deduction.

Continual evaluation and development regarding single courses must be covered by regular course reimbursement given to the department. They do not justify incentive payments.

Joint objectives

Funding of certain specific resources can be done using joint funds at faculty level. This mostly applies to relatively fixed infrastructure that will be used short- or mid-term by several degree programmes/student groups, but not by all SLU students. In
certain cases, allocation must be shared by two or several programme boards. This mostly concerns reimbursement for programme directors of studies, exercise laboratories, drafting rooms, clinical training centres and other specially designed teaching premises, cultivation facilities, field course operations, stables, animal hospitals
.

Who is responsible for what?

  • The Board of Education decides on the joint allocation model and basic reimbursement levels.
  • The programme boards decide on the reimbursement category for single courses, variable reimbursement levels and any incentive payments, other specific supplements or deductions – all within the given resource framework.
  • The programme boards propose an allocation of funds for the departments and joint objectives.
  • The faculty boards decide on the allocation of funds for joint objectives and the departments 

SLU rules at department level (step 3)

Between departments

A faculty’s resource allocation includes distributing tasks and funds between departments that run courses jointly.[8]

Within the department

The department decides how to use the funds allocated to them within the framework stated in the budget and course syllabus. Even if reimbursement is calculated per course, each department must decide how to use its resources in order to complete their assignment in the best way. However, when several departments are jointly responsible for a course, the possibility to redistribute resources is limited to the specific funds allocated to each department.

The course syllabus objectives govern how a course or programme is to be run at general level. The resource allocation model should not hinder desirable development dynamics, but provide incentives to reconsider how to carry out and implement new types of teaching. Most importantly, the course coordinator designs the schedule and therefore decides how to adjust different types of teaching, group sizes, exercise intensity, etc.

Who is responsible for what?

The head of department or the person(s) given responsibility by the head of department decides on redistribution between and within single courses.

When allocating duties within the department, the head of department must consider the working hour agreement for teachers, etc. Link to current agreement (only in Swedish)

Joint objectives

The vice-chancellor decides on basic reimbursement for university- and faculty-wide objectives (university- and faculty-wide costs) when the SLU Board decides on the allocation of funds. Reimbursement for university-wide study administration and study infrastructure, as well as the course or programme’s part of the library, is based on the predicted number of full-time equivalents and is paid from by the course and programme funds at department level. The course or programme’s share of reimbursement for other university- and faculty-wide objectives, such as staff and financial administration, as well as university and faculty management, is based on a percentage of staff salaries added as a supplement.

The course or programme share of reimbursement for department-wide objectives is decided at department level and based on a percentage of staff salaries added as a supplement.

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2.3 Organisational conditions

SLU’s educational organisation is schematically described in Annex 1: SLU's educational organisation.

Important concepts 

Dean – the head of an SLU faculty.

Delegation of authority – states the responsibilities and powers of bodies and decision-makers within the university. It also lists the composition of deciding and advisory bodies as well as their mandate periods. The departments normally have an internal division of responsibility for education issues, among other things. Student influence is described in section 3.14 Student influence.

Faculty – an umbrella term for an organisational unit led by a faculty board/deanat SLU. The faculties are responsible for the departments.

Department – university education, research and environmental monitoring and assessment are carried out at a number of departments (or equivalent). Each department belongs to at least one faculty.

Head of department – head of an SLU department.

Programme board (PN) – part of SLU’s educational organisation. See Annex 1: SLU's educational organisation.

Programme director of studies (PSR) – part of SLU’s educational organisation. See Annex 1: SLU's educational organisation.

Director of studies – normally, a department has one (or several) employees with a coordinating responsibility for departmental education at first-cycle and second-cycle level. These persons are often called director of studies, department director of studies, person responsible for undergraduate studies, deputy head of department responsible for education or equivalent. The handbook includes the term department director of studies (or equivalent) to avoid confusion with programme director of studies (see section 13.7 Programme director of studies).

University administration – supports and provides service for the university’s education, research and environmental monitoring and assessment (see the delegation of authority for the university administration).

Board of Education (UN) – part of SLU’s educational organisation. See Annex 1: SLU's educational organisation.

Annual cycle – SLU applies joint time frames for planning and decisions on the offered course and programmes. See Annex 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning.

Who is responsible for what?

The SLU Board and vice-chancellor decide on the general organisation and division of responsibility within the university. Each faculty decides on their internal division of responsibility. The departments normally have an internal division of responsibility for education issues, among other things. The Board of Education decides on the joint annual cycle for course and programme planning.

Links

Delegations of authority:

  • the SLU Board’s delegation of authority
  • the vice-chancellor’s delegation of authority
  • the university administration’s delegation of authority
  • the faculties’ delegations of authorityr

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2.4 Academic year and semester dates

Important concepts 

The academic year is divided into an autumn, spring and summer semester. The academic year begins on the first day of the autumn semester and is concluded on the last day before the next autumn semester begins.

Monday–Friday count as weekdays, excluding holidays.

National regulations

The extent of a course or study programme shall be denoted by credits, with full-time study during a normal academic year of 40 weeks corresponding to 60 credits.”[9]

SLU rules

SLU follows SUHF’s recommendation on how to divide semesters.

Semester dates including period divisions (15 credits) must be published on the SLU web at least one academic year in advance. Teaching-free days and site-specific semester information such as course and programme information and joint retake dates must be listed on the SLU web in good time before scheduling of the coming semester’s courses is done.

Normally, there is no scheduled teaching Wednesday afternoons. Exceptions may be granted by the programme board in question.

The following semester dates apply at SLU:

  • The autumn semester begins on the Monday which falls between 28 August and 3 September, and lasts for 20 weeks.
  • The spring semester begins on the first Monday after the end of the autumn semester, and also lasts for 20 weeks.
  • The summer semester begins on the first Monday after the end of the spring semester and lasts until the beginning of the next autumn semester.
  • The autumn and spring semester are both divided into two periods of 15 credits each.

Who is responsible for what?

The Division of Educational Affairs publishes semester dates, including period divisions, on the SLU web.

Site-specific information is decided by the programme board(s) responsible for education at the site in question.

Links

Semester dates

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2.5 Subject, main field of study, disciplinary domain

Important concepts

Education at first-cycle and second-cycle level is classified into subjects. Some subjects are main fields of study at SLU. Within these, SLU can offer progressive specialisation which enables the students to also be awarded general qualifications.

Every subject/main field of study is included in a disciplinary domain.

SLU’s subjects, main fields of study and disciplinary domains are listed in Annex 3: First cycle and second cycle subjects at SLU. There are also subject descriptions for the main fields of study. They are listed in an annex to Lokal examensordning – regler för examina på grundnivå och avancerad nivå vid SLU (SLU’s examination procedures for first cycle and second cycle level – only in Swedish).

Policy 

A subject/main field of study can be broad and focus on synthesis or narrow and involve specialisation. This division is not always the same at first-, second- or third-cycle level.

The main fields of study can be viewed as strategic standpoints and should also be viewed in relation to SLU’s mission statement, role and profile. Our main fields of study are important for student recruitment since they contribute to communicating course and programme content and their distinctive character. They also govern possible qualifications.

SLU rules

Subject

Course content decides subject classification. See section 6.2 Course syllabus.

When proposing a new subject at SLU which will not act as a main field of study, the following must be specified:

  • The proposed subject in question and its relation to existing subjects.
  • Justification for the proposed subject.
  • The teaching and examination competence available for the proposed subject.
Main field of study

When proposing a new main field of study at SLU, the following must be specified:

  • The proposed main field of study (subject description, including definition, disciplinary foundation and boundaries).
  • Justification for the proposed main field of study.
  • Relation to existing main fields of study (how they are affected by possible new main fields of study).
  • If the proposed main field of study will be taught at first-cycle and second-cycle level, or just at one level.
  • The teaching and examination competence available for the proposed main field of study.
  • The range of courses offered, or possible new courses, as well as degree projects (independent projects) for the proposed main field of study.

When proposing to cancel a main field of study at SLU, the following must be specified:

  • Justification for the proposed cancellation.
  • Relation to remaining main fields of study (how they will be affected by cancelling the main field of study).
  • The effect on students already admitted to a course or programme which includes the main field of study in question.
  • Proposals of transitional rules, including a time frame for when courses and degree projects (independent projects) within the affected main field of study will be cancelled.

Who is responsible for what?

  • The SLU Board decides, following proposals from the Board of Education, on main fields of study for general qualifications at first- and second-cycle level that will be available at the university.[10]
  • The Board of Education decides on the subjects available at the university that are not main fields of study.[11]

Activity

Main field of study

Proposal

Department,
programme board or faculty board

Approve/reject

Programme board, faculty board and Board of Education

Decision to set up

The SLU Board

Subject
description decision

The Board of Education

Instructions

Annex 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning lists, among other things, joint timeframes for planning and decisions on the range of courses and programmes offered. Any changes to subjects/main fields of study must made in good time to enable adjustments to e.g. course and programme syllabuses.

The following range of courses should be available, or be possible, to justify a new main field of study at first-cycle level:

  • at least 75 credits in courses with progressive specialisation (G1N, G1F, G2F);
  • 15 degree project credits (Bachelor’s project/G2E);

The following range of courses should be available, or be possible, to justify a new main field of study at second-cycle level:

  • at least 30 credits in courses with progressive specialisation (A1N, A1F);
  • 30 degree project credits at second cycle level (Master’s project/A2E);

Terms relating to course level and specialisation within a main field of study are listed in an annex to Lokal examensordning – regler för examina på grundnivå och avancerad nivå vid SLU (SLU’s examination procedures for first cycle and second cycle level – only in Swedish).

Links

Lokal examensordning – regler för examina på grundnivå och avancerad nivå vid SLU

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3. Students and student support

3.1 Starting points
3.2 Teaching environments
3.3 Equal opportunities
3.4 Study and career guidance
3.5 Study with a disability
3.6 Student copyright
3.7 Student insurance
3.8 Student costs and reimbursements
3.9 Tuition fees
3.10 Tuition fee refunds
3.11 Student debt conditions
3.12 Scholarships
3.13 Approved leave from studies and non-completion
3.14 Student influence
3.15 Complaint procedures
3.16 Appeal a decision

3.1 Starting points

National regulations

In this ordinance ‘student’ refers to those who have been admitted to and pursue higher education studies…”[12]

SLU rules

  • Only admitted and registered students are eligible to participate in a course or programme.
  • A person admitted to a programme is not automatically admitted to all courses within the programme. All students must meet the specific entry requirements that apply for each individual course. Entry requirements are listed in the course syllabuses.
  • An incoming exchange student at SLU (at first-cycle or second-cycle level) counts as a degree programme student. Incoming students have access to programme courses during their exchange period.

Links

Student web

3.2 Teaching environments

Important concepts

A teaching environment is a physical or virtual place for learning. It can be indoors, outdoors or online.

Formal (physical) teaching environments consist of auditoriums, classrooms, laboratories and group rooms (etc.). All are bookable for teacher-led learning.

Informal (physical) learning environments are public spaces (often in connection to formal teaching environments) used by students for individual work or group assignments.

Learning management systems are a large part of the virtual learning environment.

Policy

SLU’s learning environments should

  • be available to everyone;[13]
  • offer teachers and students a good work environment;
  • promote various forms of student learning;
  • meet social and intellectual needs;
  • facilitate dialogue between teachers and students;
  • support dialogue and cooperation between students, and
  • be flexible in the short- and long-term.

SLU management of teaching environments should be characterised by the following:

  • teaching-oriented visions;
  • long-term and multiannual planning;
  • uniform management, regardless of faculty or site;
  • controllable and transparent finances, and
  • a rational support organisation.

SLU rules

  • Teaching, tests or other activities relating to education may not be disturbed.

  • Normally, students may not have children or pets with them in connection with educational activities. The teacher (for individual classes) or the course coordinator (for an entire course) determines what applies for each case.

  • Special regulations, and (occasional) safety ordinances, apply for certain premises and activities relating to education, e.g. laboratories, libraries, stables, clinics, excursions, study visits and examinations. See chapter 8. Examination (tests) and compulsory steps.

Who is responsible for what?

The Division of Educational Affairs, Division of Facility Management and Division of IT, which work within university administration, coordinate teaching environment issues.

Länkar

Buildings and rooms

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3.3 Equal opportunities

Important concepts

Harassment constitutes conduct that violates a person’s dignity and is associated with one of the seven grounds of discrimination. It may take the form of comments, gestures or freezing someone out. The victim of harassment decides what they consider harassing.

Harassment can also be of a sexual nature. It is then called sexual harassment. In addition to comments and words, it can take the form of groping or intrusive looks. Unwelcome compliments, invitations and innuendos also count as sexual harassment.

Discrimination is when someone is treated unfairly or violated. In order to be constituted as discrimination, unfair treatment or violation should be connected to the seven grounds of discrimination (see below).

Policy

Equal opportunities work at SLU should result in equal opportunities and equal rights for staff and students in their work and studies respectively. This work is specified and documented in annual action plans at university-wide level and faculty level.

National regulations

SLU’s equal opportunities work for all employees and students is based on the Discrimination Act.[14] The purpose of this act is to combat discrimination and harassment and in other ways promote equal rights and opportunities regardless of

  • sex
  • transgender identity or expression
  • ethnicity
  • religion or other belief
  • disability
  • sexual orientation
  • or age.

An education provider may not discriminate against any child, pupil or student participating in or applying for activities.[15]

Equal opportunities work also includes measures for increased accessibility.

Who is responsible for what?

SLU’s responsibility

The university must use active measures to counteract discrimination and promote equal rights and opportunities for students and employees. SLU has an equal opportunities organisation to support this work. The university is also obligated to investigate and take measures against harassment.

Staff and student responsibility

Both staff and students at SLU must play their part in achieving a healthy work and study environment from an equal opportunities perspective.

Instructions

A student who has been the victim of sexual harassment or other forms of harassment can receive support from various persons at the university. On the SLU web, there is more information on where to turn as well as advice for students who have been victims of harassment. There are also guidelines for how suspicions of harassment are taken care of at SLU.

Links 

Harassment and equal treatment

Equal opportunities at SLU

Guidelines for suspected student harassment in accordance with the Discrimination Act

3.4 Study and career guidance

Policy

Study and career guidance at SLU contributes to

  • Give students and prospective students access to enough information to enable them to make well-founded decisions regarding their studies and careers.
  • Support students and prospective students to view their personal resources and possibilities in relation to their studies and careers as well as to provide them with disciplinary domain rules.
  • Enable students and prospective students to make study and career decisions based on their own requests and conditions, free from limiting norms.

National regulations

Student support

Students shall be provided with study and career guidance. Higher education institutions shall ensure that those intending to begin a course or study programme have access to the information about it that is required.”[16]

The higher education institution shall also be responsible for other student welfare activities to support students in their studies or facilitate their transition to the labour market as well as otherwise providing students with a sound environment in which to study[17]

Secrecy

Among other things, secrecy applies to higher education institutions’ activities relating to “information connected to a psychological examination
or treatment, and for information regarding an individual’s personal
relationships with a psychologist, counsellor or study and career guidance,
unless it is clear that the information can be deleted without harming the
individual or their next of kin
.[18]

SLU rules

All guidance functions at SLU must maintain secrecy regarding the individual student’s personal conditions.

Who is responsible for what?

Students are always responsible to make their own decisions. Therefore, guidance means providing them with enough information and support to enable them to take a personal standpoint.

Study and career guidance for SLU students is provided by study counsellors and programme directors of studies. 

General study counsellors at the Division of Educational Affairs

Our general study counsellors are impartial and do not have any form of teacher role. The study counsellors’ operational model supports students coming to SLU, their actual studies and the transition from studying to working. They use a joint discussion model, which contributes to equal, high-quality guidance for the student.

Primary target groups:

  • prospective students
  • upper-secondary school counsellors, etc.
  • students at first-cycle, second-cycle and third-cycle level
  • alumni.

Study guidance should concern

  • general issues, e.g. questions regarding student welfare or education;
  • careers and the labour market, post-studies;
  • other student service at the university.

Study counsellors are competent at guiding students.

Programme directors of studies

Programme directors of studies primarily provide subject- and programme-specific information and guidance, and reference other student services at the university. Programme directors of studies must follow secrecy rules when counselling students.

Their main target group is students studying the programme they are responsible for.

Study guidance should concern

  • programme subject and studies;
  • referencing other student services at the university.

Programme directors of studies focus on the programme and subject in question.

Links

Study and career guidance

Contact information for the programme directors of studies can be found at the respective programme pages on the student web.

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3.5 Study with a disability

Important concepts

Permanent disabilities that can limit studies include the following:

  • reading and writing difficulties/dyslexia;
  • psychological disabilities such as prolonged depression or bipolar disease;
  • neuropsychiatric disorders such as ADHD or Asperger syndrome;
  • visual or hearing impairment;
  • physical disability;
  • chronic illness such as rheumatism;
  • lingering complications following illness or injury, such as whiplash.

Policy

The same intended learning outcomes apply to all students, regardless of any disability. By offering learning support and adjusting study situations, SLU tries to create the same opportunities to enable all students to complete their studies. The aim of learning support is to help the student overcome study obstacles caused by permanent disabilities. However, learning support can never replace the personal responsibility of the student.

National regulations

The course and programme provider must follow the Discrimination Act, which aims to counteract discrimination and in other ways promote equal rights and opportunities regardless of, among other things, disabilities.

SLU rules

Students with a permanent (not temporary) disability which limit their studies are allowed learning support. This support should be individually designed based on the student’s disability and study situation.

Who is responsible for what?

SLU’s responsibility
  • A coordinator at the Division of Educational Affairs can advise on the application for learning support, decide support type and recommend adjustments.
  • The course coordinator decides which of the recommended adjustments are possible in relation to the course syllabus, as well as what is practically possible.
  • The examiner decides which of the recommended adjustments are possible for examinations in relation to the course syllabus, grading criteria as well as what is practically possible.
Student responsibility

The student is always personally responsible for their studies and study results.

Students must apply for learning support on the SLU web. They must then attach a certificate that confirms that they have a disability. Processing time can vary over the year, but may take up to three weeks.

The student decides who they want to inform about their disability. However, a course coordinator needs to be told about any special needs before the course starts.

Students who wish to utilise their right to have exams adjusted must notify the course coordinator or course administrator and submit their adjustment recommendation. This must be done, at the latest, when applying to take an exam.

Students with decisions and recommendations from SLU regarding learning support who wish to adjust their exams must contact the course coordinator or course administration in good time, preferably when the course starts, but at least fifteen (15) weekdays before the exam takes place. They must always submit their adjustment recommendation.

Instructions

Contact information for coordinators can be found on the SLU web. There are also instructions for learning support applications, information on what support is available as well as what applies when exams are adjusted.

Links

Study with a disability

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3.6 Student copyright

Important concepts

Intellectual property rights involve rights that have been or can be protected as intellectual property in accordance with current legislation, e.g. patents, copyright, trademark, design protection and plant variety rights.

Policy

According to SLU’s intellectual property rights policy, the starting point is that intellectual property rights created in relation to university education and research is given to the originator. Both students and employees at SLU can be originators (i.e. have copyright) of literary and artistic works. Everyone is treated equally in this sense. SLU has no right to any inventions or similar that are created in combination with student works, regardless of whether they are patentable or not.

National regulations

Reproducing other people’s texts, tables, images and other illustrations can be a violation of copyright. This applies even if a quote is marked and the source is given.

SLU rules

For student work published at SLU, it is required that permission from the copyright holder is granted for the use of

  • others’ tables and figures (images, diagrams, etc.);
  • longer text quotes (> 250 words) from the same source.
Teaching

Audio/video recordings or photography relating to teaching is only allowed if this is stated in the course syllabus, or following agreement with the teacher in question. This applies to all types of teaching, including excursions, study visits, etc. It is not allowed to publish or spread photos, film or audio relating to teaching through e.g. social media without the teacher’s approval. Students are also not allowed to publish or spread teaching material without the teacher’s permission.

Students with disabilities may receive learning support, which can include, for example, audio or video recordings relating to teaching. See section 3.5 Study with a disability. The recordings are only meant for personal use, and they too require the teacher’s permission.

Students’ collected data

Data that the student has compiled is, as a rule, not the object of copyrighted material. During ongoing studies, all collected data must always be available for review by the supervisor and examiner.

If the student chooses to write an independent project (degree project) within the framework of an ongoing research project, the project manager of the research project is responsible to store necessary collected data.

Moreover, the student is not generally obligated to submit their personal data to the department when the course has concluded.

Student copyright

The student owns the copyright to their independent project and equivalent. The supervisor’s participation does not lead to joint copyright.

However, information about the supervisor must be listed when publishing an independent project. See chapter 9. Independent project (degree project).. In the event that the results from the degree project is used for publication in another context, the later publication must either refer to the degree project or the student and supervisor must be listed as co-authors.

Links

Intellectual property rights policy

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3.7 Student insurance

Important concepts

VFU = clinical training.

The Legal, Financial and Administrative Services Agency is responsible for insurance at all public authorities. Public authorities are only allowed take out insurance with the Legal, Financial and Administrative Services Agency.

Policy

It is important that students have access to relevant insurance information.

National regulations

Students at Swedish higher education institutions are insured through the Legal, Financial and Administrative Services Agency’s personal injury insurance for students. According to its’ regulations, insurance applies in Sweden when students are on university premises or travelling directly between their homes and university premises.

Insurance does not apply during their leisure time.

Complete insurance conditions can be found on the Legal, Financial and Administrative Services Agency’s web.

Förordning (1982:1077) om ersättning av allmänna medel för skador orsakade av studerande vid statliga högskoleenheter under praktik på icke- statliga arbetsplatser (ordinance for reimbursement of public funds for injuries caused by students from public higher education institutions during placement at non-governmental workplaces – only in Swedish) regulates personal injury or damage to property caused by students during VFU/placement. However, VFU/placement must be included in the course syllabus, and the student must be registered to the course in Ladok.

SLU rules

The student must be registered to a course in Ladok to be sure that they are covered by the Legal, Financial and Administrative Services Agency’s personal injury insurance for students. However, students do not need to re-register in Ladok to retake an examination, but they must register for the examination as usual.

Special rules apply for students who travel abroad for a course or degree project. Incoming students must also follow special rules – see below.

Any injuries to animals or equipment caused by a student during VFU/placement counts as damage to property.

SLU’s operational insurance covers SLU operations. It can include damages caused by a student working with the animal ambulance service or the University Animal Hospital. The course-coordinating department is responsible.

Who is responsible for what?

Insurance for incoming students
  • The Division of Educational Affairs administrates insurance for students who travel to Sweden using one of the exchange agreements that the division is responsible for. The Division of Educational Affairs also administrates insurance for students who pay tuition fees.
  • Foreign exchange students who do not pay tuition fees are covered by insurance for foreign visitors as well as personal injury insurance.
  • Foreign people who are not SLU students but who have a placement at SLU for a shorter period than a year are covered by insurance for foreign visitors.
  • The Division of Educational Affairs administrates insurance for students who travel from Sweden using one of the exchange agreements that the division is responsible for. The Division of Educational Affairs issues insurance certificates and/or Medical Insurance Cards (MICs) to all students travelling through such agreements.
  • The responsible department must insure other students who travel abroad through a course, including placements and degree projects (independent projects). This can occur in two different ways – both ways imply that the department has approved that the student can study abroad within the framework of a course. See instructions below.
Insurance for outgoing students

Instructions

There are two ways to manage insurance for students who travel abroad through a course or programme:

  • The collective insurance Student UT applies if there is a written agreement regarding exchange or reception between SLU and the receiving party. The receiving party can for example be a university, placement, company or organisation. The Legal, Financial and Administrative Services Agency have no specific requirements for the department’s written agreement. The responsible department issues Medical Insurance Card (MICs) and/or insurance certificates to students taking part of the course/course component. The MIC and insurance certificate templates can be ordered from the Legal, Financial and Administrative Services Agency.
  • If there is no written agreement between SLU and the receiving party, the responsible department must take out and pay individual Student UT insurance for every outgoing student. This normally applies if a course or course component is taught abroad, for example through an international study trip. The department orders the insurance on the Legal, Financial and Administrative Services Agency’s web. The Legal, Financial and Administrative Services Agency issues MICs and/or insurance certificates to every student taking part of the course/course component. The documents are sent to the department, which then passes them on the each student.

This also applies if a department approves a student’s request to study abroad within the framework of a course, even if the course is not included in any exchange agreements within the Division of Educational Affairs.

Links

Student insurance and notifications of damage

Förordning (1982:1077) om ersättning av allmänna medel för skador orsakade av studerande vid statliga högskoleenheter under praktik på icke-statliga arbetsplatser (ordinance for reimbursement of public funds for injuries caused by students from public higher education institutions during placement at non-governmental workplaces – only in Swedish).

Operational insurance

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3.8 Student costs and reimbursements

Policy

It is important to provide early and clear information to students regarding who pays for what. SLU must strive, as far as possible, to minimise students’ educational costs.

Students normally pay for their personal material. This also applies to students who do not pay tuition fees.

When travelling within a course or programme, public transport should, if possible, be prioritised.

National regulations

In general, the following applies:

  • SLU is allowed to charge a standard amount for literature, materials, equipment, food and accommodations for study trips, but it is important that the connection between the cost and what the student actually receives is clear.
  • The basic principle is that SLU may never charge more than the prime cost.
  • The student should always be free to obtain the equivalent product or service elsewhere.
  • In certain cases, SLU can reimburse the student for expenses that cover (some)
    student costs. It is allowed to use a standard amount, but it is important that the connection between the reimbursement and the cost is clear.

SLU rules

Literature, copying
  • Students must pay for their course literature (including compendiums and larger amounts of copied material).
  • The student must pay for copies, print-outs and memory cards (or equivalent). Academic papers and degree projects (independent projects), e.g. print-outs of self-produced material, are considered study material which the student must pay for. Students that participate in seminars must pay for their copies, i.e. print-outs of other students’ material.
  • When a certain amount of copies of a student’s academic works and degree projects must be available for archiving reasons, the responsible department must provide the amount of copies in question.
  • Students with a disability may have the right to free copying, for example if there is a need for enlarged copies.
  • The responsible department may charge a fee (cost price) to make a copy of a public document. However, the first nine A4 pages are free of charge to the student. For example, this applies to questions and the student’s answers to written examinations.
Material, equipment
  • The student must pay for certain study materials, for example, consumables (such as textile materials, clay, paints, etc.), if they are to have disposition of the result.
  • Consumables in laboratory premises are paid for by SLU.
  • The responsible department or faculty must provide protective equipment necessary to protect against illness and accidents at no cost or through a deposit fee. If the faculty assesses that personal protective equipment is preferable, the faculty must reimburse the student for the costs of such equipment. However, the student must pay for their clothes and other personal equipment.
  • Deposit fees for keys and/or cards for access to libraries, computer rooms and similar may be charged. The first card is free for the student.
Study trips in immediate areas

In general, the student must pay for travel costs within the site and its immediate area. Here, immediate area refers to an area that can be reached with local transport within a reasonable amount of time.

Study trips with personal cars

Students may be reimbursed for personal car expenses paid in connection with a study trip, excursion or equivalent. In those cases, SLU applies the Swedish Tax Office’s standard for tax-exempt car reimbursement per every ten kilometres. The responsible department decides if any reimbursement will be paid, and must provide this information before the trip.

Study trips compulsory for a qualification

If a course includes costs for study trips, this must be stated in the course information on the course page at least four weeks before the course starts.

For study trips outside the site area, the responsible department must reimburse the student with at least 50 per cent of the student’s costs for travel and accommodation. The student must normally pay for other costs.

If the department cannot pay at least 50 percent of the student’s costs for travel and accommodation, they must provide a cost-free alternative to the study trip.

Study trips not compulsory for a qualification

If a course is expected to include great costs for the student (e.g. for international study trips), this must be stated in the course syllabus under additional information. If travel costs are lower (e.g. for domestic study trips) this must be stated in the course information on the course page at least four weeks before the course starts.

Placement

The student must normally pay for all additional costs for education that consists of, or includes, workplace-based placement or clinical training. However, SLU may reimburse the student for increased living expenses. The responsible programme board funds such reimbursements.

Students taking courses or programmes with required placements must be given clear information early on. Course or programme presentations must include such information prior to application.

Instructions

In order to assess necessary protective equipment for students, the same working conditions that apply to employees also apply to students. Examples of protective equipment are protective eyewear, hearing protectors, breathing protectors, protective gloves and protective shoes. Protective coats (“lab coats”) can also be viewed as protective equipment in work with animal material, chemicals and microorganisms.

Links

The car expenses and payment form can be found under 2. Payments. See Blanketter för ekonomihantering (only in Swedish).

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3.9 Tuition fees

National regulations

Non-citizens or those who do not have residence permits in an EEA state or Switzerland (“third-country nationals”) must pay tuition fees for education at first-cycle and second-cycle level.[1]

Tuition fees must be based on the principle of full cost coverage of fee-funded activities.[2]

SLU rules

SLU follows the guidelines applied by the Swedish Agency for Higher Education Services’ (UHR) regarding the management of tuition fees, as well as the Association of Swedish Higher Education’s (SUHF) recommendations[3] within the field.

General information about tuition fees
  • Tuition fees are comprised of three components:
  1. A basic fee that depends on the type of course or programme in question. See below.
  2. A study administrative fee intended to cover reception and service costs, scholarship and fee management, accommodation administration as well as marketing of tuition fees for students not from EEA states or Switzerland. The current fee is SEK 22,000 per academic year.
  3. A central appropriation fee aimed to cover some of the deficit for bookable teaching premises and non-bookable teaching premises, the vice-chancellor’s strategic funds as well as programme board costs. The current fee is SEK 8,000 per academic year.
  • The central appropriation fee and study administrative fee are removed before the remaining part of the tuition fee is distributed to the departments in question.
  • The tuition fee amount can be found on the SLU web and is listed per course, programme semester and complete degree programme.
Tuition fees for degree programmes
  • The basic fee is based on each programme’s division of disciplinary domains[4] and the reimbursement levels for each disciplinary domain listed in the faculties’ allocations of funds at the time when tuition fees were approved. This means that programmes within the same category have the same fee per semester.
  • A programme student pays their tuition fee per semester. The fee is calculated based on 30 course credits per semester within the programme the student is studying.
  • Student costs for whole courses or programmes is determined through the information given during admission to the programme.
  • Programme students in exchange programmes arranged by SLU must still pay their tuition fees to SLU during their exchange studies.
  • Credit transfers not arranged by SLU involves lowering the tuition fee using the transferred credits as a basis.
Tuition fees for courses
  • The basic fee for individual courses is based on the reimbursement levels for each disciplinary domain[5] listed in the faculties’ allocations of funds at the time when tuition fees were approved.
  • Classifying courses into disciplinary domains is based on each course’s subject classification in Ladok.
  • A student taking a freestanding course must pay a tuition fee based on the amount of course credits.
When must tuition fees be paid?

The student must pay their tuition fees before every semester starts. SLU decides on the exact payment time using SUHF recommendations. In order for the student to begin their studies, they must have paid their whole tuition fee to SLU beforehand.

The tuition fee includes the offer of accommodation, but not rent or other costs connected to admission to or studies at SLU. See section 3.8 Student costs and reimbursements.

In accordance with sections 8.5 Compulsory steps and 8.11 Renewed exam (retake session), students who have not completed their courses may do so at a later date without being charged extra tuition fees. Students may be re-registered to a course without having to pay another fee. This only applies if there are available places within the course. Re-registration is managed in the same way as for students funded through direct government funding.

Who is responsible for what?

The Division of Educational Affairs decides how much a student must pay for the coming semester.

Tuition fee levels are reviewed and updated (if necessary) every three years. The Division of Educational Affairs decides on the update of tuition fees to current reimbursement levels. The Board of Education decides on any updates of the central appropriation fee and study administrative fee.

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3.10 Refunding tuition fees

In certain cases, a paid tuition fee can be refunded:     

  

Circumstance

  

Refund

  

The student drops out before the course or programme begins.

The prepaid tuition fee is refunded.

The student applies for a deferment in paying their tuition fees before the course or programme begins. (A denied residence permit is not a reason for deferment.)

If the application is
granted, the prepaid tuition fee is refunded
.

The tuition fee has been prepaid and the student has begun their studies but drops out within the first three weeks.

The prepaid tuition fee
is refunded
.

The student is denied to continue their studies by the Higher Education Expulsions Board or suspended by the disciplinary board.

The prepaid tuition fee
is not refunded
.

The student’s fee status changes, for example through citizenship.

Exception: The student applied for citizenship or a residence permit for other reasons than to study before the semester started, but was only informed of their status after the semester begun.

The prepaid tuition fee is not refunded.

The prepaid tuition fee for the current semester is refunded.

The admission decision is revoked because the student was admitted using false qualifications.

The prepaid tuition fee is not refunded.

The student’s residence permit is revoked.

The prepaid tuition fee
is not refunded.

No interest will be added to refunded amounts, and refunds are normally paid to the same account the payment was made from.

Who is responsible for what?

To request a refund, the student must personally confirm their given reasons. The student must send their refund request to the Division of Educational Affairs.

The head of the Division of Educational Affairs decides[1] whether to refund prepaid tuition fees.

If the student’s fee status changes, for example through citizenship, they must report this change to the Division of Educational Affairs by submitting verifying documents. However, a change of status does not apply retroactively – see the table above.

Section 3.11 Student debt conditions describes the consequences if tuition fees are not paid

Links

Learn more about application and tuition fees at www.antagning.se.

There are tuition fee exceptions for foreign citizens from outside the EU/EEA/Switzerland.

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3.11 Student debt conditions

This section contains information about debt caused by unpaid tuition fees as well as other types of debt where the student owes SLU money.

National regulations

A student who is liable to pay a tuition fee and who fails to pay this by the due date, and has received a reminder from the university, will be excluded from the programme or course until the fee has been paid. A decision to exclude the student from studies means that the student may not participate in teaching, examination or any other activity pertaining to study at the university. In special cases, the university may also decide that degree or course certificates will not be issued until the fees have been paid.

Students exempted from paying tuition fees

Any debt conditions between a student exempt from paying tuition fees and the responsible department do not affect the student’s right to teaching, examination, reporting of study results or the right to get course or degree certificate.

Students liable to pay tuition fees

Tuition fees must be paid for one semester in advance. If a student still has not paid their full tuition fee for a degree programme or course which they have been registered to, they must pay the remaining amount before a course or degree certificate can be issued.

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3.12 Scholarships

Important concepts

SLU may, to the extent that funds are available, award scholarships to students liable to pay tuition fees.[26] These scholarships can consist of the whole or parts of the tuition fee and should be given to especially qualified students liable to pay tuition.

Rules

The following apples for the distribution of such scholarships at SLU:

  • The scholarship amount is not paid directly to the student. Instead, the scholarship holder’s tuition fee is paid for every semester that the student studies a programme during its regular length, which is normally 4 semesters (120 credits) for a Master’s programme.
  • In order to keep their scholarship, the student must have received at least 20 credits per semester during previous semesters within the programme. The student must also carry out their Master’s programme studies during regular programme length, i.e. 4 semesters (120 credits). If the pace of study is a minimum of 20 credits one semester, it is presupposed that they pace is higher than 30 credits during another semester/semesters.
  • A scholarship offer only applies for the number of years and programme listed in the scholarship decision. If the student is granted a deferment of studies until the next academic year, the decision to award a scholarship may be reevaluated.
  • The decision to award a scholarship may also change if the student changes course or programme.
  • If the decision to award a scholarship only includes part of the tuition fee, the student must pay the remaining amount before a given date.

There are specific provisions for scholarships awarded by foundations and endowment foundations managed by SLU. Regler och delegationsordning för utdelning av stipendier vid SLU (rules and delegation of authority for the distribution of scholarships at SLU – only in Swedish) apply for other scholarships.

Who is responsible for what?

At SLU, the Division of Educational Affairs manages scholarships for students liable to pay tuition fees. The head of the Division of Educational Affairs decides on specific principles and criteria for distribution of SLU’s scholarships funded by UHR. Following proposals from the head of the Division of Educational Affairs, the vice-chancellor decides which students will receive scholarships.

Links

Scholarships

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3.13 Approved leave from studies and non-completion

Important concepts

Deferment of studies – the student keeps their place, but is allowed to postpone the start of their study period.

Approved leave under specific circumstances – the student takes leave from their studies and is guaranteed a place within the course or programme when their leave is over.

Approved leave without specific reasons – the student takes leave from their studies without submitting an application or without giving specific reasons.

Definitive non-completion of a programme – the student drops out of a programme and ceases to be a programme student.

Non-completion of a course – the student drops out of a course.

National regulations

“If special grounds exist, a higher education institution may decide that students admitted to first or second-cycle studies at the institution:

  1. may defer commencement of their studies, or
  2. may continue their studies after an approved leave of absence.”[27]
Deferment of studies

Specific reasons for deferring studies may be social, medical or other circumstances such as care of a child, military or civilian service, student union assignments, military basic training in accordance with Förordningen (2015:613) om militär grundutbildning (ordinance for military basic training) or postponed holiday in accordance with the Employee’s Right to Educational Leave Act (1974:981).

Specific reasons can also be a fixed-term employment with a probationary period in accordance with section 12 of Lagen (2012:332) om vissa försvarsmaktsanställningar eller tjänstgöring i Försvarsmakten (act on specific appointments or duties in the Swedish Armed Forces). This applies to employees who work part-time as gruppbefäl, soldat or sjöman in accordance with this act.

Unless there are particular reasons to extend a deferment, the maximum allowed time to take a leave of studies is 18 months.[30]

Approved leave from studies

Specific reasons for a student to continue their studies following an approved leave from studies may be social, medical or other circumstances such as care of a child, military or civilian service, military basic training in accordance with Förordningen (2015:613) om militär grundutbildning (ordinance for military basic training) or student union assignments.

Specific reasons can also be a fixed-term employment with a probationary period in accordance with section 12 of Lagen (2012:332) om vissa försvarsmaktsanställningar eller tjänstgöring i Försvarsmakten (act on specific appointments or duties in the Swedish Armed Forces). This applies to employees who work part-time as gruppbefäl, soldat or sjöman in accordance with this act.

Students who can cite specific reasons using a certificate may be granted approved leave from studies and a guaranteed right to resume their course or programme during a specific semester.[31]

SLU rules

Approved leave from studies
  • Programme students can apply for approved leave from studies as of their second semester at the earliest. If a student applies for approved leave from studies during their first programme semester, this is considered a deferment of studies.
  • The right to resume their studies applies if this is done within the granted period.
  • Only leave granted by SLU gives students the right to resume their studies at the university.
  • The student is allowed to take examinations during their leave from studies.
  • Approved leave without specific reasons is unregulated and basically means that the student is not allowed to resume their studies. It does not matter if they report their leave or not.
  • If there are places available, it is possible that the student may resume their studies following leave without specific reasons. However, they must be aware that the degree programme may have been altered in regard to the range of courses offered. See section 13.6 Changes to the range of courses offered within a programme.
  • Exchange studies carried out with SLU partners count as programme studies. A programme student who wishes to carry out exchange studies does not need to apply for approved leave from studies.
Non-completion
  • Definitive non-completion of a programme requires the student to submit a written document confirming this. They then cease being a programme student.
  • If they want to resume their programme studies, they need a new admission decision. It is possible to be admitted to the latter part of a programme. When the student resumes their studies, the course syllabus at the time of their return applies.
  • In order to properly drop out of a course, the student must submit a written document stating that they will not be completing the course. See section 7.6 Non-completion of a course.

Who is responsible for what?

Where appropriate, the student must do the following:

  • apply for a deferment of studies;
  • apply for approved leave from studies for specific reasons;
  • submit a document confirming that they will not be completing their studies – it is recommended that they contact the programme director of studies or study counsellor before deciding on this;
  • see Instructions and Links below;
  • also see section 7.6 Non-completion of a course.

The Division of Educational Affairs manages deferments, approved leave from programme studies and non-completion of a programme. Approved leave from studies is documented in the study documentation system Ladok, and decisions regarding leave from studies are always sent to the student.

The Division of Educational Affairs is responsible to ensure that applications concerning deferment, leave from studies and non-completion of a programme are archived together with the decisions relating to these matters.

The responsible department manages non-completion of a course. See section 7.6 Non-completion of a course.

Instructions

The following can be found on the SLU web:

  • information on how to apply for deferment of studies. However, it is important to first accept the offered place at www.universityadmissions.se;
  • form used to apply for approved leave from studies for specific reasons;
  • form used for definitive non-completion of a programme.

Students who wish to appeal their requests for deferment of studies or refusal of their application to take leave from studies can turn to the Higher Education Appeals Board. See section 3.16 Appeal a decision.

Links

Approved leave from studies and non-completion

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3.14 Student influence 

It is the opinion of SLU that all activities concerning education and its support operations must be based on mutual trust and responsibility between students and teachers. This approach is in both the students’ and university’s best interest since it is a prerequisite to achieve education of the highest possible quality.

Current legislation requires SLU to work to ensure that students play an active part in course and programme development. It is strong wording which comprise all things related to education.

The purpose of this section is to clarify how reciprocity and responsibility might look, to help assess if legal requirements are met as well as to act as a basis for discussion and a joint starting point for student influence issues at SLU. How this is implemented at SLU must vary since prerequisites vary between course and programmes as well as sites.

National regulations

  • “Students shall be entitled to exert influence over the courses and study programmes at higher education institutions. Higher education institutions shall endeavour to enable students to play an active role in the continued development of courses and study programmes.”[1]
  • “The students are entitled to representation when decisions or preparations are made that have bearing on their courses or programmes or the situation of students.”[2]
  • “If decisions or preparations are to be made by one single individual, information is to be provided and consultation take place with a student representative in ample time before the decision is made or preparations concluded.”[3]
  • “If a decision is to be made by a group of individuals [...] the students are entitled to representation by at least three members. The number of student representatives in such a group may however be fewer if there are special grounds in view of the total number of members in the group.”[4]
  • “The students are entitled to be represented by three members of the board of governors.”[5]
  • “The students at the higher education institution shall be entitled to representation on the [disciplinary] board by two members.”[6]
  • “The Government or the agency nominated by the Government issues regulations on who is to appoint representatives of the students.”[7]
  • The student union(s) appoint and dismiss students from higher education institution bodies.[8]
Formal influence through representation on SLU bodies

SLU students have the right to be represented on all decision-making and preparatory bodies which operations are important to education and student situations.

Student influence is based on the students’ unions, which represent themselves. They are in turn regulated by Studentkårsförordningen (SFS 2009:769) (the student union ordinance). Among other things, it states that the students’ unions are responsible to represent all students – even those who choose not to be a part of the union.

Students have the right to be heard, and their opinions must be the base for many decisions relating to education. Courses and programmes are meant for students, and not just the students currently taking them. The university is also responsible to ensure that the students of tomorrow receive education of the highest quality, and it must consider conflicting expectations and requests. If the university makes decisions that do not correspond to student opinion, this should not be viewed as a sign that there is not student influence.

The university must make it easier for student representatives to complete assignments related to student monitoring. Representatives can do this in parallel with their studies or through approved leave from studies for more extensive assignments.

The starting point is to process and prepare matters in good time. That way, students have plenty have time to get involved before a decision must be made. Normally, the student representatives in question should have access to relevant supporting documents and opinions five days before a decision is to be made. Complex matters require even more long-term planning than simpler and routine matters.

However, planning may have to be shorter for pressing issues. Normally, decision-making bodies consisting of student members do not meet during the summer semester.

Consultation relating to preparation and decision by a single SLU official

Legislation considerably requires students to be consulted in other matters which affect them, both in regard to course and programme content as well as the student situation in general. This includes decisions within the administration, often made by a single official. For example, these decisions can concern accessibility, equal opportunities, IT support and the library.

In addition, working groups and other preparatory bodies which must submit supporting documents on issues regarding education and the student situation must also consult the students. The obligation to consult students also applies when a single official makes a decision. The starting point is to process and prepare matters in good time. That way, students have plenty have time to get involved. Normally, the student representatives in question should have access to relevant supporting documents and opinions five days before a decision is to be made.

The right to student influence does not include decisions which affect a single student. However, student representatives can affect the principles for such decisions and follow up on how they are applied.

Who is responsible for what?

SLU

The whole of SLU, not just teachers, must aim to engage students with activities that concern education. This means that heads of department, those responsible for courses and programmes and managers at all levels must ensure that the university meets this requirement. The programme directors of studies are explicitly responsible to ensure that their programmes include student influence.

Most importantly, it is the vice-chancellor’s responsibility to ensure that there are procedures for student influence on preparatory bodies and for decisions made by a single official. The boards, programme directors of studies and managers together with student representatives must ensure that student influence is accomplished in detail within daily university work.

Students

At SLU, the Joint Committee of Student Unions at SLU, Sluss, appoints students to university-wide bodies as well as to faculty andprogramme boards. It stands to reason that students appoint their own representatives without the university getting involved, both in regard to the division of members as well as questions concerning personality.

Cooperation and information

In order to facilitate student influence, SLU must continually keep the Joint Committee of Student Unions at SLU (Sluss) informed of the decision-making bodies that exist at the university, and student representatives are to be offered a place on all preparatory and decision-making bodies involved in education. It can be difficult to decide which bodies are involved in education, but the starting point is that the students decide if they wish to be represented, not the university.

It is incumbent on SLU to provide collective registers on the current preparatory and decision-making bodies and their purposes, but the students’ unions prioritise which bodies they want to be part of. The students’ unions are responsible to report which bodies they will be part of and the persons they have appointed. SLU is responsible to remind students about which bodies lack representation as well as to inform the students when new bodies/working groups are established. This responsibility lies with the persons who made the decision to establish a new body or working group.

At SLU, students have not traditionally been represented on e.g. decision-making bodies relating to environmental monitoring and assessment or research issue committees. There are a few bodies that do not allow student representatives – such as the staff disciplinary board – because it manages disciplinary matters relating to employees. Each delegation of authority states the number of established bodies and their student representatives. See section 2.3 Organisational conditions.

Instructions

SLU’s delegations of authority state which bodies include students and how many members Sluss must appoint.

Student members are given a sessional allowance.[1] Students not employed at SLU who are regular members[2] of a board, committee, working group, reference group or equivalent established by the vice-chancellor, deans or head of university administration, have the right to a fee of SEK 600 per meeting. If requested, reimbursements can be made for lost salary earnings. The fee normally includes preparatory and supplementary work.

Deputies have the right to receive a fee when they work, i.e. replace a regular member. Student representatives should contact the respective body’s secretary for practical management of their fees.

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3.15 Complaint procedures

Important concepts

If a course or programme does not follow this education planning and administration handbook, a course syllabus or programme syllabus, the student must be able to submit complaints, ask questions and give opinions and proposals regarding their education. Complains can also include that SLU does not follow laws or other statutes.

Instructions

A student (or group of students) dissatisfied about anything should primarily contact the person responsible in order to find a solution to the problem. The simplest way to influence education is to participate in course and programme evaluations.

Students who feel that SLU have broken a law or regulation within the higher education institution field can report this to the Swedish Higher Education Authority (UKÄ) (http://www.uka.se/).

If there are complaints regarding education at course level, the following actions are recommended:

 

Courses

Programmes

Processing of an educational matter

Decision on an educational matter

Firstly

Contact the teacher, course coordinator or examiner in question.

 

Contact the programme director of studies in question.

Contact the administrative officer responsible for the matter in question.

 

Contact the decision-maker if the reason for the decision needs to be clarified.

 

Secondly

Contact the department director of studies (or equivalent) or the head of department at the department responsible for the course

Contact the faculty programme director at the respective faculty office; they can
confirm which body you should turn to
.

 

Contact the manager at the administrative officer’s division.

Certain decisions can be appealed. See below.

Contact
information

Department
directors of studies and heads of department are listed on the SLU web
.

Programme
director of studiesand faculty programme directors are listed on the
SLU web
.

Managers
within the university administration are listed on the SLU web
.

See below.

Here, educational matters concern admission, credit transfer, issuing qualifications and similar decisions relating to a single student. Grades cannot be appealed.

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3.16 Appeal a decision

National regulations

The following are examples of what can be appealed at the Higher Education Appeals Board:[1]

  • a decision that an applicant does not meet the general entry requirements for admission to first or second-cycle higher education courses and study programmes and a decision not to grant an exemption from the general entry requirements [− − −];
  • a decision on the transfer of credits for courses and study programmes or professional or vocational activities;
  •  rejection of a student’s application for exemption from a compulsory step of a course or study programme;
  • rejection of a student’s request to be issued with a degree certificate or a course certificate, and
  • a decision not to allow those admitted to first or second-cycle courses and study programmes to defer commencement of their studies or to continue their studies after an approved period of leave.

Instructions

A decision must appealed in writing. In the appeal, the student must state which decision is being appealed and what change they request. The appeal must address the Higher Education Appeals Board, but submitted to SLU, Box 7070, 750 07 Uppsala. The appeal must have been submitted to SLU within three weeks from the day the student was made aware of the decision.

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4. Teachers and examiners

4.1 Starting points
4.2 Educational development
4.3 University teacher with merit-based salary increment (“Excellent teacher”)
4.4 Degree-awarding powers at department level
4.5 Examiner
4.6 Competence requirements for examiners
4.7 Change of examiner
4.8 Teacher copyright
4.9 Staff liability issues

4.1 Starting points

Important concepts

Teachers

SLU has the following teacher categories:[1]

  • professor
  • visiting professor
  • adjunct professor
  • senior lecturer
  • associate senior lecturer
  • adjunct lecturer
  • lecturer
  • adjunct senior lecturer.

However, in everyday speech, the term “teacher” is often used to describe all teaching staff, including those who do not belong to any of the above categories.

Examiner

See section 4.5 Examiner.

Course coordinator

The course coordinator is the teacher or other SLU employee who is operationally responsible for the implementation of the course. For contracted courses, the course coordinator can be a teacher or other employee from another higher education institution. The course coordinator and examiner can be the same person.

Policy

SLU’s vision, objectives and strategy to attract, recruit and maintain teaching expertise is described in other governing documents. Among other things, see the SLU strategies and strategic direction documents.

Rules

Rules concerning employment at SLU can be found in other governing documents. Among other things, see the appointments procedure at SLU.

Who is responsible for what?

The faculty boards[2] plan teaching appointments to give courses and programmes the prerequisites for quality based on an academic or artistic footing and on proven experience.

The responsible department must ensure that students have access to contact information for

  • the course coordinator (on the course page)
  • the examiner (on the course page)
  • the head of department (on the department page) and
  • the department director of studies (or equivalent) (on the department web).

The faculty offices are responsible to ensure that contact information for programme directors of studies can be found on the student web programme pages.

Links

Appointment procedures for teachers at SLU

Strategies and strategic direction documents

My employment

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4.2 Educational development

Policy

Courses and programmes must meet high scientific and teaching quality requirements. SLU places great importance on such qualifications when employing and promoting teachers. There must be opportunities for educational and other types of professional development since they contribute to new thinking and course development as well as specialised subject knowledge and research connections.

SLU rules

The appointment procedures at SLU regulate the competence requirements for various types of employment.

Who is responsible for what?

The Educational Development Unit (EPU) at the Division of Educational Affairs works to promote higher education development at SLU. The unit is responsible for the university’s courses in higher education teaching.

Links

Unit for Educational Development (EPU)

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4.3 University teacher with merit-based salary increment (“Excellent teacher”)

Important concepts

The title of “excellent teacher” enables SLU to reward and highlight skilled and educationally aware teachers. Excellent teachers are expected to actively take part of quality assurance work relating to education and teaching within the subject area and the university.

Policy

The title of “excellent teacher” enables SLU to reward and highlight skilled and educationally aware teachers. Excellent teachers are expected to actively take part of quality assurance work within the subject area and the university.

SLU rules

The vice-chancellor decides on specific rules and instructions regarding the appointment of excellent teachers. Teachers (lecturers, senior lecturers and professors) or those with corresponding expertise and duties employed for an indefinite period can be appointed excellent teachers.

In order to be appointed excellent teacher at SLU, the applicant must have broad teaching expertise. In order to be appointed an excellent teacher, the candidate must have expertise within the following five knowledge areas:

  • teaching expertise
  • scientific and developing approach
  • cooperation with colleagues and educational leadership
  • holistic perspective and cooperation within the university and with society
  • critically grounded in the subject.

Who is responsible for what?

The Board for the Appointment of Excellent Teachers (Nex) manages calls and applications regarding the title of excellent teacher.

Instructions

Complete information with instructions for excellent teacher applicants at SLU can by following the link below.

Links

Unit for Educational Development (EPU)

Excellent teachers

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4.4 Degree-awarding powers at department level

Important concepts

Subject

Courses at first- and second-cycle level at SLU are among other things classified according to the subject content. SLU subjects are listed in Annex 3: First cycle and second cycle subjects at SLU.

Main field of study

Some subjects are main fields of study and act as a basis for general qualifications. Main fields of study at SLU are also listed in Annex 3: First cycle and second cycle subjects at SLU.

SLU rules

In order for a department to have the right to assess first-cycle students within one of SLU’s main fields of study, it must have teachers with a doctorate employed for an indefinite period and who have relevant subject knowledge and/or researchers employed for an indefinite period with docent expertise within a relevant field.

In order for a department to assess students at second-cycle level within one of SLU’s main fields of study, it must employ at least one professor with relevant subject knowledge.

In order for a department to assess students studying subjects other than SLU’s main fields of study, it must employ at least one teacher within a relevant subject area.

In order for a department to assess students taking courses belonging to two main fields of study or subjects (double-classed courses), the department must have degree-awarding powers within both main fields of study/subjects. Otherwise, another department that has the power to award degrees in the other main field of study or subject must award the degree together with the responsible department.

For contracted courses from another higher education institution, the competence requirements from that institution apply to the examiner.

The responsible faculty can decide to grant time-limited exemptions regarding the right to award degrees to a department in relation to a subject or main field of study.

Who is responsible for what?

Each faculty must define which of SLU’s main fields of study that the faculty departments and any units are allowed to assess. This must also be done for subjects that do not constitute main fields of study at SLU.

The faculty board decides which bodies within the faculty organisation will decide on each department’s right to award degrees.

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4.5 Examiner

Important concepts

The examiner grades student performance within a course.

Grading criteria connects grades to levels of meeting a course’s intended learning outcomes. A pass grade means that the student has fundamentally met the objectives in the course syllabus.

National regulations

“Unless otherwise provided by the higher education institution, a grade shall be awarded on completion of a course. [− − −] The grade shall be determined by a teacher specifically nominated by the higher education institution (the examiner).”[1]

“The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences may also appoint someone who does not hold a teaching post to act as examiner in first, second and third-cycle courses and study programmes.”[2]

SLU rules

As a rule, each course must have one examiner. Information about the examiner for individual courses must be available on the course page no later than when the course begins.

There are specific rules for independent projects. See chapter 9. Independent project (degree project).

For contracted courses or other forms of cooperation with another higher education institution, the examiner can be employed by the other institution. In those cases, the rules at the higher education institution in question apply to the examiner.

Who is responsible for what?

The head of department[3] at the responsible department appoints examiners. See the section Excellent teachers.

4.4 Degree-awarding powers at department level, 4.6 Competence requirements for examiners and 4.7 Change examiner.

The faculties must document and follow up examiners for each course.

The responsible department must ensure that the examiner is listed on the course page no later than when the course begins.

Examiners

  • are responsible to ensure that course content and level follow the established course syllabus;
  • establish grading criteria (see section 7.1 Early course information);
  • are responsible for assessing student performance;
  • decide grades by authorising results in Ladok.

Other teachers may take part in the examination by co-grading in accordance with the examiner’s instructions, but it is the examiner who is ultimately responsible and makes the grading decision. There are specific rules for independent projects. See chapter 9. Independent project (degree project).

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4.6 Competence requirements for examiners

SLU rules

First-cycle level

Examiners at first-cycle level:

  • have (at least) a Degree of Master within a relevant field, or a professional qualification at second-cycle level within a relevant field;
  • are employed at the responsible or jointly responsible department;[1]
  • have taken a course on examination and grade assessment, and
  • meet one of the options below (1a, 1b or 2).
Second–cycle level

Examiners at second-cycle level:

  • have (at least) a Degree of Doctor within a relevant field;
  • are employed at the responsible or jointly responsible department;
  • have taken a course on examination and grade assessment, and
  • meet one of the options below.
Option 1a

In accordance with SLU’s current appointment procedures, the person has a teaching post as one of the following:

  • professor, visiting professor, adjunct professor or
  • senior lecturer, associate senior lecturer, adjunct senior lecturer
  • adjunct lecturer, adjunct senior lecturer.
Option 1b

In accordance with SLU’s previous appointment procedures, the person has a teaching post as one of the following:

  • professor, adjunct professor or
  • senior lecturer, adjunct senior lecturer
  • lecturer, adjunct lecturer
  • research associate
  • part-time or visiting lecturer.
Option 2

The person does not have a teaching post but does have a

  • doctoral degree
  • an indefinite period employment which requires a doctoral degree or corresponding expertise
  • relevant educational expertise which correspond to the requirements to be employed as a senior lecturer.
Exemptions

Time-limited exemptions concerning the right to award degrees within a course are granted by the responsible faculty.

Equivalence assessment

For courses with considerable elements of occupational skills training, an equivalence assessment may be made of the student’s relevant professional experience. An equivalence assessment may also be made of artistic development work for courses within the artistic field.

Who is responsible for what?

The responsible faculty makes equivalence assessments.

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4.7 Change of examiner

National regulations

“A student who has taken two examinations in a course or a part of a course without obtaining a pass grade is entitled to the nomination of another examiner, unless there are special reasons to the contrary.”[1]

This request can also concern nominating another teacher to take part of the assessment without acting as examiner. Special reasons speaking against the student’s request can for example be that there are no examiners or teachers with the right qualifications.

Who is responsible for what?

The head of department decides whether to change examiner or participating teacher for individual students.

Instructions

The student must submit a written request to change examiner (or co-grading teacher) to the head of department or department director of studies (or equivalent) at the responsible department.

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4.8 Teacher copyright

Important concepts

Intellectual property rights involve rights that have been or can be protected as intellectual property in accordance with current legislation, e.g. patents, copyright, trademark, design protection and plant variety rights.

Policy

According to SLU’s intellectual property rights policy, the starting point is that intellectual property rights created in relation to university teaching and research is given to the originator. Both students and employees at SLU can be originators (i.e. have copyright) of literary and artistic works. Everyone is treated equally in this sense. SLU has no right to any inventions or similar that are created in connection with student works, regardless of whether they are patentable or not.

National regulations

Reproducing other people’s texts, tables, images and other illustrations can be a violation of copyright. This applies even if a citation is marked as such and the source is given.

SLU rules

Teacher material

Teachers who develop their own teaching material during their employment own the material copyright. However, SLU has the right to use teaching material developed within the framework of the employment. It means, among other things, that SLU has the right to make the material available and to make copies of it, both printed and electronic.

Students are not allowed to publish or spread teaching material without the teacher’s permission.

Teaching

Audio/video recordings or photography relating to teaching is only allowed if this is stated in the course syllabus, or following agreement with the students in question. This applies to all types of teaching, including excursions, study visits, etc. It is not allowed to publish or spread photos, film or audio relating to teaching through e.g. social media without the teacher’s permission.

Students with disabilities may receive learning support, which can include, for example, audio or video recordings relating to teaching. See 3.5 Study with a disability. The recordings are only meant for personal use, and they too require the teacher’s permission.

Links

Intellectual property rights policyTillbaka till kapitlets början

4.9 Staff liability issues

National regulations

If a staff member intentionally or through carelessness disregards their obligations, this may be regarded as neglect of duty. In certain cases this will lead to disciplinary measures in the form of a warning or salary deduction.

The staff disciplinary board deals with issues regarding the following:[1]

  • dismissal from employment due to personal conditions [− − −]
  • disciplinary responsibility
  • notifications of legal action
  • suspension.

Who is responsible for what?

The head of department at the staff member’s department decides whether to report staff liability issues to the vice-chancellor. If the staff member works within university administration, their head of division makes the decision.

The staff disciplinary board decides whether neglect of duty will lead to measures or not. The Government Disciplinary Board for Higher Officials decides on measures for higher posts.

Instructions

If a student wants to make a complaint about a staff member at SLU, they must primarily turn to the head of department where the person in question is employed. Also see section 3.15 Complain procedures.

Deputies have the right to receive a fee when they work, i.e. replace a regular member. Student representatives should contact the respective body’s secretary for practical management of their fees.

The staff disciplinary board only handles serious staff liability cases.

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5. Quality assurance

5.1 Starting points
5.2 Course evaluations
5.3 Programme evaluations
5.4. Student welfare follow-up
5.5 Dialogues on quality

5.1 Starting points

Policy

Quality assurance procedures are systematic efforts to improve courses and programmes in every way in accordance with our values and strategy. The procedures concern educational content and academic levels, but also the conditions provided by the university to ensure that the students assimilate as much knowledge as possible when studying, i.e. both the physical and student welfare environment. For example, they can concern planning and implementing courses, access to equipment and rooms as well as an open, validating discussion climate where everyone gets to speak on their terms.

Working with quality issues gives the students the opportunity to practice developed approaches. This will benefit them in their future professional lives. From an early stage, SLU is responsible to clarify that the students are personally responsible for their education, which includes quality development.

SLU’s quality assurance system monitors quality assurance procedures at the university. See below.

National regulations

“Quality assurance procedures are the shared concern of staff and students at higher education institutions.”[1]

A national system for quality assurance within higher education is being put into practice during 2017–2022. Within this framework, the Swedish Higher Education Authority (UKÄ) is reviewing the following: quality assurance procedures at higher education institutions, course and programme evaluations, degree-awarding powers and thematic evaluations.

SLU rules

SLU’s quality assurance procedures and quality assurance are described in the following documents:

Framework for the quality assurance of courses and study programmes at SLU (strategy document)[2]

Instructions for systematic quality assurance at SLU (instructions for applying the framework/strategy)[3]

SLU’s quality assurance system can be summarised in the following way:

  • SLU must offer high-quality courses and programmes. A necessary condition for this is ensuring that the educational process is of high quality.
  • SLU follows definitions on what constitutes high quality of the educational process listed in national and international agreements as well as requirements stipulated by law. The definitions (quality standards) are based on the university’s strategic objectives and values as well as guidelines, rules and policies relating to education.
  • By using systematic quality assurance, we ensure that all aspects of the educational process meet the quality requirements listed in the quality standards.
  • Quality assurance supports a culture where joint quality standards are the starting point in both educational work as well as support and control system development work.

Quality assurance consists of regularly recurring and systematic present-state analyses and dialogues on quality. The present-state analysis is carried out by the programme board in question. Quality dialogues are held between the persons responsible for education at university level (Board of Education) and the programme board in question. After the quality dialogues have been carried out, the Board of Education makes an assessment of whether the quality assurance procedures relating to courses and programmes are sufficient enough to ensure that the operation in question is of high quality. The Board of Education decides on cases where quality assurance inspires adequate measures to ensure continued high-quality development.

Course evaluations (see section 5.2 Course evaluations) and the recurring student welfare survey (see section 5.4. Student welfare follow-up) are important quality assurance tools. Through programme evaluations (see section 5.3 Programme evaluations) and alumni surveys, other aspects of educational quality can be highlighted, but these methods are not used as much or as systematically as the above.

Who is responsible for what?

Different parts of the organisation are responsible for education quality at SLU.[4] The main quality assurance procedures are the responsibility of the individual employees in their daily work: students, doctoral students and staff.

Links

Quality assurance of courses and programmes
Student welfare surveys
SLU alumni activities

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5.2 Course evaluations

Policy

Course evaluations must be followed up and used as a tool in the quality development of courses. They must be handled in such a way that both student and teacher integrity is preserved. Therefore, students must have the right to be anonymous when writing course evaluations.

Good higher education presupposes well-designed and implemented course evaluations. This in turn presupposes reciprocity. The course evaluation system is based on enabling students to give constructive feedback on courses and teaching. Teachers must then use the evaluations as a valuable instrument for quality development. Students should feel that their opinions are met with interest and respect.

Student feedback is part of the course, and they are not reimbursed for their time. Since course evaluations are voluntary for students, it is important that the responsible department provides information on and organises course evaluations with the aim to receive as many responses as possible. It is suitable to invite the student representative who takes part in compiling the results to also take part of the work described above as well as scheduling the course evaluation session.

National regulations

“Higher education institutions shall enable students who are participating in or have completed a course to express their experiences of and views on the course through a course evaluation to be organised by the higher education institution.”[1]

“The higher education institution shall collate the course evaluations and provide information about their results and any actions prompted by the course evaluations. The results shall be made available to the students.”[2]

SLU rules

Course evaluations results and conclusions must be reported in the joint electronic course evaluation system Evald. Where appropriate, information on course adjustments, and/or reasons to keep criticised content and design should be listed in the system. The results reported in the compilations are number responses for issues common to all courses, as well as summaries of student and teacher feedback.

Before the course is carried out again, the results from previous course evaluations must be presented, as well as information on any changes caused by previous course evaluations.

A student has the right to represent the student group and take part of the compilation of course evaluation feedback. This work is reimbursed with SEK 400 per course. This fee makes up some of the costs for course implementation, which means that the department in question does not receive special resources for this purpose. The amount is the same regardless of the credit amount or number of students.

Who is responsible for what?

SLU teachers and students are jointly responsible to ensure that course evaluations are carried out. The responsible department must:

  • compile and follow-up their respective course evaluations unless the responsible faculty decides something else;
  • report course evaluation results and conclusions in the joint electronic course evaluation system Evald;
  • pay a remuneration, but only for one course date per student;
  • archive compilations and course evaluations in accordance with Annex 4: Archive course information.

Instructions

To receive their remuneration, student representatives who take part of the course evaluation compilation must fill in a form (see below) and submit it to the responsible department.

Links

Evald

Student remuneration form

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5.3 Programme evaluations

Policy

Students who participate in, or completed, a degree programme are given an opportunity to express their experiences and views on the programme. An SLU objective is to carry out continual programme evaluations in connection when students apply for a qualification. Programme evaluations must be followed up and used as a tool in the quality development of courses and programmes. In addition, there must be procedures for following up programme students (student completion and non-completion).

Students who participate in, or completed, a degree programme are given an opportunity to express their experiences and views on the programme by completing a programme evaluation. Programme evaluations must be followed up and used as a tool in the quality development of courses and programmes.

Who is responsible for what?

The programme boards are responsible to carry out degree programme evaluations.[2] Programme directors of studies are responsible to follow up student results, both qualitatively and quantitatively.[2] The Division of Educational Affairs and the Division of Planning must provide system support of this follow-up.[2]

Links

Lins (management information system) (requires login).
Programme evaluations

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5.4. Student welfare follow-up

Policy

SLU continually carries out a student welfare survey.

Who is responsible for what?

The Student Welfare Council (Strå) is responsible for the student welfare survey.[2]

Links

Student welfare surveys

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5.5 Dialogues on quality

Important concepts

Joint quality themes and standards are specified in the Framework for the quality assurance of courses and study programmes at SLU.

Who is responsible for what?

The instructions for systematic quality assurance of courses and programmes at SLU state, among other things, what is expected of all concerned parties before, during and following quality dialogues.

Instructions

The instructions for systematic quality assurance of courses and programmes at SLU list, among other things, planned review cycles at an annual or long-term basis (6 years), working methods and documentation.

Links

Framework for the quality assurance of courses and study programmes at SLU.
Instructions for systematic quality assurance of courses and programmes at SLU.

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6. Course syllabus and course dates

6.1 Starting points
6.2 Course syllabus
6.3 Grading system
6.4 Course dates
6.5 Cancellation of a course
6.6 Course modules

6.1 Starting points

Policy

In order to give students good conditions to carry out their studies with good results, it is important to provide them with clear information early on.

SLU rules

In order to carry out a course, the following is required:

  • an approved course syllabus – see section 6.2 Course syllabus
  • an approved course date – see section 6.4 Course dates and
  • planned implementation – see chapter 7. Before and when a course starts.

Who is responsible for what?

The department in question is responsible to implement a course. There may be one or more departments that are jointly responsible to implement a course.

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6.2 Course syllabus

Policy

It is important to have joint timeframes for courses (start and end dates). This enables students to choose courses more freely and to jointly study various courses.

National regulations

“A course shall have a course syllabus.”[1]

SLU rules

SLU’s rules are based on the rules stipulated in the Higher Education Ordinance and SUHF recommendations. This means that each course syllabus at SLU must include the following:

  • course code
  • course title
  • credits
  • course type
  • subjects
  • educational level
  • specialisation
  • grading scale
  • language
  • entry requirements
  • objectives
  • content
  • examination format and requirements to pass a course
  • possible transitional provisions
  • other information[2]
  • responsible department and any jointly responsible departments.

These aspects are described further below.

Course codes are generated by Slukurs. The course title should relate to the content.

Credits

The scope of the course must be listed in credits. A course normally comprises 15 credits and is taught full-time for a period (i.e. half a semester). If justified, two courses of 7.5 credits can be offered for a period. See section 2.4 Academic year and semester dates.

Summer courses and freestanding courses not taught at full-time can have different scopes. The Board of Education (UN) can grant exemptions from the joint timeframes for courses within individual programmes if there is reason to do so.[3] There are specific rules for independent projects. See chapter 9. Independent project (degree project)..

Subjects

Subject classification depends on the course content. Annex 3: First cycle and second cycle subjects at SLU. It includes a list of subjects and main fields of study.

At SLU, a course can be classified into one or two subjects (double classification). However, independent projects (degree projects) can only be classified into one subject.

Educational level

SLU has the following level classification:

  • access course or programme
  • first-cycle level
  • second-cycle level
  • third-cycle level (not included in the handbook).
Specialisation

The progressive specialisation of the course within the main field of study for general qualifications should be indicated using the codes recommended by SUHF (G1N, G1F, G2F, G2E, A1N, A1F, A1E, A2E, GXX, AXX – see the instructions for course syllabuses). A single course can only be available at one level and include one specialisation.

Grading scale

See section 6.3 grading system. In addition, the following standard text is automatically displayed in Slukurs:

“The various grade requirements for a course are listed in the grading criteria which must be made available when the course starts at the latest.”

Language

The course language can either be Swedish or English.

  • In order to study first-cycle courses, the general entry requirements state that the student must understand both Swedish and English. This means that those courses may include content in English even though the course language is Swedish.
  • There are no language requirements for second-cycle courses unless they are stated as specific entry requirements. This means that second-cycle courses taught in English cannot have Swedish content unless it is listed as an entry requirement.
  • Unless the course syllabus states otherwise, exams are held in the course language.
Entry requirements

Specific entry requirements must be listed, and the following applies:

  • “Any specific entry requirements imposed shall be totally essential for a student to be able to benefit from the course or study programme.”[4]
  • To be admitted to a second-cycle course, the student must have obtained at least 120 credits at first-cycle level.
  • For courses at second-cycle level taught in English, the entry requirements must correspond to English 6 taught at upper-secondary school. These requirements are met by students with a Bachelor’s degree (180 credits) from a Swedish higher education institution or 120 credits of completed studies at SLU.
  • First-cycle courses taught entirely in English are exempted from the entry requirement concerning Swedish. This must then be listed in the course syllabus.
Objectives

Course objectives must:

  • describe the intended learning outcomes (see the instructions for course syllabuses);
  • clarify both subject and general expertise;
  • be formulated in regard to course level, specialisation and prior knowledge and be written in bullet point form;
  • contribute to the overall objectives listed in each programme syllabus if the course is included in one or several degree programmes;
  • be included when assessing student performance.

The content must include a short description of both the subject content and course implementation.

Examination format and requirements to pass a course

The forms for assessing student performance concern how to carry out examinations and what is required to pass a course. If the course contains compulsory elements, this must be indicated.

In addition, the following standard text is automatically displayed in Slukurs:

  • “If the student fails a test, the examiner may give the student a supplementary assignment, provided this is possible and there is reason to do so.
  • If the student has been granted special educational support because of a disability, the examiner has the right to offer the student an adapted test, or provide an alternative assessment.
  • If changes are made to this course syllabus, or if the course is closed, SLU shall decide on transitional rules for examination of students admitted under this syllabus but who have not yet passed the course.
  • For the examination of a degree project (independent project), the examiner may also allow the student to add supplemental information after the deadline. For more information, see the educational planning and administration handbook.”
Transitional provisions

Transitional provisions must be listed:

  • when a course is altered in a way that affects examination formats and requirements to pass a course, and
  • when a course is cancelled.
Other information

Any other regulations not covered in other parts of the course syllabus must be stated if necessary. In addition, the following standard text is displayed in Slukurs:

  • “The right to take part in teaching and/or supervision only applies to the course date which the student has been admitted to and registered on.
  • If there are special reasons, the student may take part in course components that require compulsory attendance at a later date. For more information, see the educational planning and administration handbook.”

The department coordinating the course, and any other jointly responsible departments, must be listed.

Miscellaneous information

If the course is included in one or several degree programmes, this connection must be included, but it is not part of the actual course syllabus. It should also say whether the course is offered as a freestanding course.

If another course takes the place of, is replaced with or overlaps with the course in question, this information must also be included.

Who is responsible for what?

The responsible department documents the course syllabus in both Swedish and English in Slukurs.

If cooperation stretches over faculties, the participating parties must be consulted in the manner agreed upon by the programme boards in question.

The programme board approves[5] course syllabuses and any programme connections. The course syllabus must include the decision date and decision-making body as well as when the course syllabus begins to apply.

The programme director of studies decides[6] when to revise course syllabuses. When a course syllabus is revised, a new version with the same course code is created. The following remains unchanged:

  • course code
  • course title
  • number of credits
  • subject
  • level and specialisation
  • grading scale.

The faculty office must submit the following for archiving:

  • course syllabus as an annex to a protocol
  • programme board protocol
  • course syllabus revision.

Instructions

There are instructions on how to write uniform course syllabuses. See Links.

The course syllabus must be available on the SLU web and universityadmissions.se as soon as possible – when course applications are open at the latest. SLU applies joint time frames for planning and decisions on the offered course and programmes. See 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning.

Links

Instructions for course syllabuses

Course syllabus template (Word)

Antagningsordning för tillträde till utbildning på grundnivå och avancerad nivå (admission regulations for first- and second-cycle education – only in Swedish)

Lokal examensordning – regler för examina på grundnivå och avancerad nivå vid SLU (SLU’s examination procedures for first cycle and second cycle level – only in Swedish). Includes teaching and research duties for SLU’s main fields of study

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6.3 Grading system

National regulations

“Unless otherwise provided by the higher education institution, a grade shall be awarded on completion of a course. The higher education institution may determine which grading system is to be used.”[1]

SLU rules

Grading scales

SLU uses a four-point criterion-referenced grading scale:

  • 5 (pass with special distinction)
  • 4 (pass with credit)
  • 3 (pass)
  • U (fail)

If a decision has been made to exempt a certain course module (module/test) or a certain course or programme, a two-point criterion-referenced grading scale is used:

  • G (pass)
  • U (fail)

SLU follows SUHF recommendations regarding the application of the ECTS Grading Table in the following way:

  • compiling the percentage allocation of pass grades per grade for each course;
  • listing the division of pass grades per grade for each completed course in the Transcript of Records, in connection with information on the used grading system;
  • including information on the division of grades from when the course was established with the current course code until the student completed the course. If the course has been carried out a minimum of two times, Ladok automatically calculates the division of grades. If a student requests it, a separate certificate is issued for new courses.
Course exceptions

Exceptions from the four-point grading scale can for e.g. be made for introductory, short courses and practical skill training courses, excursions, etc. when assessment is primarily based on student participation.

The amount of courses with allowed exceptions:

  • Up to 25 per cent of courses within a first-cycle programme, including first-cycle courses within long professional programmes (5 years) may be assessed in accordance with the two-point scale. However, this does not include independent projects.
  • Up to 10 per cent of courses within a second-cycle programme, including second-cycle courses within long professional programmes (5 years) may be assessed in accordance with the two-point scale. However, this does not include independent projects.
Course module exceptions

The grading scale for course modules (previous modules or tests) may differ from the scale that applies for the course in general. See section 6.6 Course modules.

Programmes exceptions

Valid reasons to be exempted from the four-point grading scale that applies for all courses within a degree programme is that there is no need for grading scales. The reasons are:

  • to facilitate student mobility between programmes and sites;
  • make selections within programmes;
  • attract foreign students;
  • strengthen student employability;
  • facilitate cooperation with other education providers and joint studies with other programmes, and/or
  • the programme leads to a qualification that includes a certification.

The following degree programmes are currently exempted from the four-point grading scale:

  • the Veterinary Nursing programme[2], 180 credits
  • the Veterinary Medicine programme[3], 330 credits
  • The Board of Education decides if a programme will be exempted from the four-point grading scale.
  • The programme board decides if a course will be exempted from the four-point grading scale.
  • The examiner decides on the grading scale for a course module (previously module or test) for individual courses.

Who is responsible for what?

At a student’s request, the Division of Educational Affairs issues a separate certificate on the division of grades for new courses.

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6.4 Course dates

Important concepts

A course date is the start and end date for a course.

Several course dates in an academic year or for an entire degree programme are described in a course schedule. Example:

Åk

Period   I

Period   II

Period   III

Period   IV

1

Course α, 15 credits

Courseβ,
15 credits

Course η, 7,5 credits

Course θ,
7,5 credits

Course δ,
15 credits

2

Course γ, 15 credits

Course ζ, 15 credits

Independent project, 30 credits 

Policy

The basic idea is that courses are open to freestanding students. It is important that SLU includes long-term planning of its range of courses.

Programme courses can be exempted if it is difficult or unsuitable to offer the course in question to freestanding students, e.g. capacity limitations, content and/or entry requirements.

Courses taught in English may be exempted from the UHR’s English web, if it is difficult or unsuitable to offer the course to freestanding, international students. It is important to make a conscious choice of which courses will be advertised on the English web.

SLU rules

Information regarding which courses will start in the coming academic year must be available on the SLU web and antagning.se no later than when the admission period for the autumn semester begins. However, summer courses may be added later.

A course should be advertised as soon as possible in order to provide information before each admission period. At this time, both the course syllabus and course date must be approved. See Annex 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning.

Who is responsible for what?

The programme board decides on:

  • the course dates for the coming academic year
  • which programme courses will be open to freestanding students and
  • which courses taught in English that will be exempted from UHR’s English web.

A course may be included in several degree programmes and therefore affect different programme boards. However, there must always be a responsible programme board for each course. This must be documented in Slukurs.

If cooperation stretches over faculties, the participating parties must be consulted in the manner agreed upon by the programme boards in question.

SLU applies joint timeframes for planning and decisions on the offered course and programmes. See 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning.

Links

First-cycle and second-cycle courses

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6.5 Cancellation of a course

 

 

Important concepts

A course date is the start and end date for a course.

Policy

It is important for the students to have access to a predictable set of offered courses. Therefore, programme boards must work not to cancel course dates.

SLU rules

General information

A course date included in an established range of courses offered may only be cancelled in exceptional cases, and only if the decision can be justified.

The same decision-making body that established the range of courses offered must decide whether to cancel a course date. See section 6.4 Course dates. A decision to cancel a course must be made by 1 June before the autumn semester begins and by 15 November before the spring semester begins.

Programme courses – compulsory

Compulsory programme courses may not be cancelled if there are programme students who plan on taking the course at a regular rate of study. This includes students who return following granted deferment/approved leave from studies.

Programme courses – elective

An elective programme course may be cancelled if, among other things, it is expected that a maximum of 10 students will participate. In these cases, an alternative course must be offered. The alternative course must primarily correspond to the applied course in regard to entry requirements, and also contribute towards the fulfilment of the degree requirements in a corresponding manner.

Freestanding courses

Courses without a programme connection may be cancelled if it is expected that a maximum of 15 students will participate. An alternative course cannot always be offered.

Cancellation of a course following an admission decision

In exceptional cases, SLU can cancel a course after admission decisions have been sent to students, but only if one of the following requirements are met:

  • None of the admitted students demand their place in the course.
  • In the first selection, the admission decision states that the course may be cancelled. In those cases, this reservation must be decided by the same body that established the offered course.

Who is responsible for what?

The responsible department must carry out a compulsory programme course even if the examiner or other teacher resigns, takes sick leave or equivalent.

The programme board must ensure that there is an alternative course date that corresponds to a cancelled, elective programme course date.

Instructions

If a responsible department wishes to cancel a course date, it must submit a request to the programme board in question, which makes the decision. If a course date is cancelled, the programme board must quickly notify both the students who applied to the course and the Division of Educational Affairs.

The faculty office which supports the programme board in question must submit the decision to cancel a course date for archiving.

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6.6 Course modules

 

Important concepts

A course module is a part of a course in the form of credits. It was previously called a module or test in Ladok.

Several results notes relating to a course module can be entered in Ladok. When all results have been reported, the course module is listed as passed in Ladok.

The following examples illustrate the relationship between a course module and course results: KE0000 Chemistry, 15 credits.

Option A
  • Course module: 0001 General Chemistry, 7 credits. Includes the following result notes:
    • Examination General Chemistry
    • Laboratory session 1
    • Laboratory session 2
  • Course module: 0002 Organic Chemistry, 8 credits. Includes the following result notes:
    • Examination Organic Chemistry
    • Laboratory session 3
    • Written assignment
Option B
  • Course module: 0001 Examination, 6 credits. Includes the following result notes:
    • Examination General Chemistry
    • Examination Organic Chemistry
  • Course module: 0002 Laboratory sessions, 3 credits. Includes the following result notes:
    • Laboratory session 1
    • Laboratory session 2
    • Laboratory session 3
  • Course module: 0003 Written assignment, 1 credit. Includes the following result notes:
    • Written assignment

Policy

Normally, courses of 15 credits or more must include course modules.

Course module advantages:

  • The student receives credits for modules they pass and subsequently student finance payments from the Swedish Board of Student Finance (CSN).
  • CSN does not accept manual certificates but bases its assessment on information in Ladok.
  • Registered results facilitate entry requirements checks, for example if the student has enough credits to take the next course.

SLU rules

Course modules (previously called modules or tests) must be listed for each course date:

  • Modules must be added in Ladok before an autumn semester starts – 31 May at the latest.
  • Modules must be added in Ladok before a spring semester starts – 30 November at the latest.

Who is responsible for what?

The examiner decides how to divide a course into course modules. The responsible department must enter the modules in Ladok before the deadline.

Instructions

Course modules from previous course dates remain if no new modules are added.

SLU applies joint timeframes for planning and decisions on the offered course and programmes. See 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning.

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7. Before and when a course starts

 

7.1 Early course information
7.2 Course date application
7.3 Course date admission
7.4 Start of a course
7.5 Course date registration
7.6 Non-completion of a course

7.1 Early course information

 

Policy

In order to give students good conditions to carry out their studies with good results, it is important to provide them with clear information early on. This is particularly important for students with disabilities.

SLU rules

Course literature

The reading list must be available on the course page at least eight (8) weeks before the course starts.

Timetable

The timetable must be available on the course page at least four (4) weeks before the course starts. The timetable must include:

  • the timeframes for scheduled activities – especially compulsory elements, field exercises, study trips and similar – but the other content does not need to be specified;
  • dates, times and locations for scheduled exams and
  • the date for the first retake session.

If the course includes study trip (or equivalent) costs, this must be stated four weeks before the course starts, at the latest. See section 3.8 Student costs and reimbursements.

Grading criteria

Grading criteria must be available on the course page no later than when the course starts. All the pass grade requirements must be clearly listed for the course in question.

They must also include the exam timeframes for the course, and whether a student must complete the course within a certain time to receive higher than a pass grade.

See chapter 8. Examination (tests) and compulsory steps.

Who is responsible for what?

The responsible department must:

  • ensure that the reading list, timetable and grading criteria are available on the course page before the stipulated deadline;
  • archive information about each course date in accordance with Annex 4: Archiving course information.

The course coordinator must approve the reading list and timetable, unless the responsible department has decided something else.

The examiner must decide the grading criteria. See section 4.5 Examiner. Grading criteria for independent projects are discussed in chapter 9. Independent project (degree project).

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7.2 Course date application

 

 

National regulations

“A person seeking admission to first or second-cycle higher education shall apply within the time prescribed and in compliance with the procedures laid down by the higher education institution.”[1]

The Swedish Agency for Higher Education Services (UHR) coordinates higher education applications in Sweden. The application deadline for each semester can be found at www.antagning.se or www.universityadmissions.se.

Applications can be made at:

SLU rules

Normally, programme students must apply for coming programme courses. When no application is necessary to study a programme course, this must be stated in the programme information on the SLU web.

Who is responsible for what?

Students must apply before the set deadline. However, certain courses allow late applications if there are places available.

When no application is necessary, this must be stated in the programme information on the SLU web. In those cases, the Division of Educational Affairs in cooperation with the faculty offices in question are responsible for providing programme information.

Instructions

Applications can be submitted at www.antagning.se or www.universityadmissions.se, depending on whether the course language is Swedish or English. There are special course application channels for incoming exchange students.

Links

Application and admission
www.antagning.se
www.universityadmissions.se

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7.3 Admission to courses

National regulations

“Any specific entry requirements imposed shall be totally essential for a student to be able to benefit from the course or study programme.”[1]

Exceptions

“A higher education institution shall waive one or more entry requirements if the applicant has the capacity to benefit from the course or study programme without meeting the entry requirements.”[2]

Conditional admission

Students who have not met the entry requirements when the admission decision is made can still be admitted. However, in those cases, they may have to meet the requirements when the course starts.

Reply to the decision

If the applicant must reply to the admission decision, the decision must include:

An applicant who has been admitted to a course and accepted it, but who does not intend to take the course, must decline as soon as possible at www.antagning.se or www.universityadmissions.se.

SLU rules

The SLU Board has approved admission regulations for education at first-cycle and second-cycle level at SLU. See Links.

SLU follows UHR guidelines and SUHF recommendations relating to the area.

Admission from waiting list

A student can see if they have a waiting list number at www.antagning.se or www.universityadmissions.se. If the student is given a place in the course, the responsible department must notify them via email. After receiving an offer to take the course, the student must reply within 24 hours.

Late admission

Normally, all course dates are open for late admission for two weeks after the course starts, if there are any available places. Late admission is then closed, unless the department director of studies (equivalent) at the responsible department request an exemption. Independent project (degree project) courses are generally exempted from this rule. Students who have applied for degree courses are put on a waiting list if admission takes place two weeks after the course starts. The course coordinator in question then decides whether the student can take the course.

Who is responsible for what?

The student must:

  • accept or decline their place (within 24 hours for admission from waiting list);
  • meet any admission decision requirements no later than when the course starts;
  • prove that they have met the requirements to the responsible department.

The head of admissions decides the following[3]:

  • admission for courses or programmes at first-cycle and second-cycle, including conditional admission and
  • entry requirement exemptions.

The course coordinator or the person appointed by the course coordinator must, if necessary, do the following:

  • when the course starts, check that the student meets the admission decision conditions;
  • contact applicants on the waiting list in accordance with the NyA web.

Instructions

The applicant receives an email saying that their admission decision is available under My Studies at www.antagning.se or www.universityadmissions.se. If the student is given a place in the course through the waiting list, the responsible department must notify them via email.

Links

Application and admission

Antagningsordning för tillträde till utbildning på grundnivå och avancerad nivå (admission regulations for first- and second-cycle education – only in Swedish)

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7.4 Start of a course

Important concepts

Every course date has some sort of start. They can be arranged in different ways.

Policy

In order to give students good conditions to carry out their studies with good results, it is important to provide them with clear information early on.

SLU rules

When a course starts
  • The students are presented with the course objectives and grading criteria, which are available in written form. See section 4.5 Examiner.
  • All the pass requirements are clarified for the course date in question. See section 8.1 Examinations (tests) and grading.
  • The complete timetable is available in written form. The timetable includes:
    • dates, time and location for regular examinations (tests, including written assignments and equivalent);
    • any deadlines for higher than pass grades – see section 8.1 Examinations (tests) and grading;
    • date for renewed examination (the first retake session), in connection with the course.
  • Students are also provided with any bonus-giving assignments and how to carry them out. See section 8.1 Examinations (tests) and grading.
  • If the course includes extra costs for the students, this must be stated. See section 3.8 Student costs and reimbursements.
  • Previous course evaluations (outcome and measures) are presented.
  • Information is also provided on how course evaluations are carried out; this includes selecting a student representative. See section 5.2 Course evaluation.

If self-registration is used – see section 7.5 Course date registration – students should be reminded to register for the course.

Who is responsible for what?

The examiner is responsible to provide information on examinations and grading. The course coordinator is responsible for other information and to make the course information above available on the course page within a given time, unless the department decides something else.

The responsible department must archive information about each course date in accordance with Annex 4: Archiving course information.

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7.5 Course date registration

Important concepts

By registering, the student confirms that they accept their place in the course.

Self-registration means that the student personally registers for the course.

Continued registration is done every new semester when a course runs over several semesters.

Re-registration can be done when a student needs to study (parts of) a course once again. However, students do not need to re-register in Ladok to retake an examination, but they must register for the exam as usual.

Policy

The responsible department must offer the students the possibility to register themselves or register them no later than when the course starts. Self-registration is the norm, but it does not apply to the first course within a first-cycle degree programme.

SLU rules

Registration

Normally, self-registration is open five (5) weekdays before the course starts and the day when the course starts. The responsible department can decide other self-registration times. However, courses with applicants on a waiting list should close self-registration when the course starts in order to contact the applicants and offer them places.

When the responsible department registers students (i.e. when self-registration is not allowed), the student must be registered in Ladok as soon as possible, no later than three weekdays after the course starts or three weekdays after the student began taking the course.

Lost course place

A student who does not attend the course when it starts and who has not self-registered may lose their place unless they have notified the responsible department beforehand stating why they cannot attend the beginning of the course. Accepted reasons are listed in section 8.6 Special reasons.

Late start to a course

If a student has not lost their place on a course that has started, they can start taking the course after it has begun.

Who is responsible for what?

The course coordinator must decide:

  • if an admitted student loses their place – they must be notified by email;
  • if it is possible to start taking a course after it starts – after two (2) weeks, the department director of studies must decide on late admissions. See section 7.3 Admission to courses.

You must be authorised to register students on courses and to work in Ladok.

Instructions

If a student has lost their place, the message can be formulated in the following way: “The course started today. You have not registered or participated in the start of the course. In addition, you have not notified us that you could not attend. This means that you have lost your place in the course. Your place will be given to an applicant on the waiting list.

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7.6 Non-completion of a course

Important concepts

Non-completion of a course means that the student drops out of a course. The student must submit a written document stating that they will not be completing the course.

If a student wants to drop out of a course within three weeks after the course starts, this is called early non-completion of a course. If the student drops out early, they can apply for the course at a later date.

SLU rules

If a student wants to drop out of a course later than three weeks after the course starts, they cannot apply for the course again. If they still apply for the course, they will be encouraged to contact the responsible department for information on re-registration and renewed examination (retake session).

Who is responsible for what?

The student must:

  • personally report that they are dropping out (within three weeks after the course starts) through “Ladok student” on the student web;
  • notify the responsible department (later than three weeks after the course starts) that they are dropping out.

The responsible department must:

  • Report non-completion in Ladok for the student who drops out of a course later than three weeks after the course starts.
  • Have follow-up procedures for monitoring students who drop out of a course three weeks after the course starts. However, the student must submit their non-completion in writing in order for it to be registered.

Instructions

The three-week check can be carried out by sending an email to students who have not participated at all or who have been frequently absent/inactive during the first three weeks of the course.

Links

Approved leave from studies and non-completion

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8. Examinations (tests) and compulsory steps

8.1 Examinations (tests) and grading
8.2 Examination times, locations and registration
8.3 Rules for written examinations
8.4 Other types of examination (tests)
8.5 Compulsory steps
8.6 Special reasons
8.7 Grading decisions
8.8 Reporting results and documentation
8.9 Feedback and handing back written examinations
8.10 Alternative examination session
8.11 Renewed examination (retake session)
8.12 Renewed examination (retake session) limitations

8.1 Examinations (tests) and grading

Important concepts

There are various forms of examinations (tests). An examination can be made up of several parts, e.g. a number of laboratory sessions, seminars, excursions or guest lectures. As a rule, results for such exams are not communicated until all parts have been completed.

National regulations

“Unless otherwise provided by the higher education institution, a grade shall be awarded on completion of a course.”[1] The Administrative Procedure Act also includes requirements on the exercise of official authority that is examinations.

SLU rules

The examiner must grade a student’s performance on a course in accordance with the course syllabus objectives. See section 4.5 Examiner. This means making a qualitative assessment of the student’s knowledge, skills and abilities, based on one or several examinations. Quantitative assessments can also be required to pass a course, e.g. being present for compulsory steps.

General information

Unless the course syllabus states otherwise, exams are held in the course language.

A passed examination cannot be retaken to achieve a higher grade.

The listed grading criteria may differ between course dates for the same course. A student who completes a course following leave is assessed in accordance with the criteria that apply when the course is completed, regardless of the criteria that applied when they began taking the course.

For programmes offered in collaboration with another higher education institution, other terms may apply for examinations. Normally, the rules of the responsible department at the higher education institution apply.

Individual assessment

Examinations may be held with an individual or a group of individuals, but must be devised in such a way that an individual assessment can be made. Group assignments, for example, must be presented in such a way that examiner can perceive individual student contributions.

The examiner may request supplementary presentation from the student if this is necessary for assessing their individual performance.

The course syllabus governs

Course syllabuses include examination formats and requirements to pass a course, which are the bases of assessing student performance. See section 6.2 Course syllabus. However, deviations from the course syllabus may be made in the following cases:

  • If there are grounds for it, the examiner is entitled to set supplementary assignments for a student who has not obtained a pass grade on an exam. Se section 8.6 Special reasons. Such supplementary assignments must comply with the times specified for renewed exams, as applicable.
  • If the student has been granted special educational support because of a disability, the examiner has the right to offer the student an adjusted test, or provide an alternative assessment.
  • If a course syllabus is changed or a course is cancelled, adaptations may be made to the assessment of a student who was admitted under the previous course syllabus. See section 8.11 Renewed exam (retake session).
Bonus-giving assignments

A course can include bonus-giving assignments, even though they might not be listed in the course syllabus. However, there cannot be any requirements that state that students must complete such assignments to pass the course. The examiner is responsible for providing information on bonus-giving assignments when the course starts.

Deadlines for higher grades

The awarding of a higher than pass grade (4 or 5) may depend on passing the course before the deadlines set by the examiner. If so, this must be clear from the grading criteria for the higher grade levels.

In general, the following applies:

  • Examinations: It must always be possible to receive a higher than pass grade (4 and 5) on the course’s first retake session, where applicable. Further retake sessions do not normally include this possibility, if there is a deadline for higher grades. However, if there are special reasons, (see section 8.6 Special reasons) higher than pass grades may be possible for these sessions as well.
  • Written assignments (or equivalent): The deadlines specified at the beginning of the course apply for written assignments. If there are special reasons, (see section 8.6 Special reasons) an extension of the deadline must be granted, and it must still be possible to receive a higher than pass grade (4 and 5), where applicable.
  • Independent projects (degree projects): See chapter 9. Independent project (degree project)..
Modules

A course can be divided into modules. See section 6.6 Course modules. Several result notes relating to a course module can be entered in Ladok. When all results have been reported, the course module is listed as passed in Ladok.

Who is responsible for what?

The examiner must decide the grading criteria. See section 4.5 Examiner. Grading criteria for independent projects are discussed in chapter 9. Independent project (degree project).

 

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8.2 Examination times, locations and registration

Important concepts

An examination (exam) can either be written (on paper or digital) or oral. Where applicable, the rules for other examination formats apply.

SLU rules

Compulsory examination application
  • As of the autumn semester 2018, students should apply for all examinations, including ordinary exams.
  • As of the autumn semester 2019, students must apply for all examinations, including ordinary exams. By that time, if a student has not applied to take an examination, they are not allowed to participate.
  • Examination applications must be submitted at least ten (10) weekdays before the examination takes place.
  • Students with decisions and recommendations from SLU regarding learning support who wish to adjust their examination must contact the course coordinator or course administrator in good time – preferably when the course starts, but no later than fifteen (15) weekdays before the examination takes place.
  • Ordinary and other forms of examinations for campus-based teaching normally take place during weekdays between 8am and 5pm for a specific course date.
  • Take-home examinations and written assignments within a specific course date must be carried out during ordinary working hours (weekdays between 8am and 5pm). This still if applies if they take several days to compete.
  • Retakes and alternative examination sessions for a specific course date may take place during other times than weekdays between 8am and 5pm.
  • Examinations are not carried out during the Christmas and New Year’s holidays, or during the month of July. However, summer courses may include examinations in July.
  • All forms of examination must normally take place during a given place and time. The course timetable must include this information.
  • Late changes to locations or times may mean that SLU must offer an alternative examination session should a student be prevented from being at the right place at the right time.
Implementation
Location

SLU may allow a student to take an exam at another location, if the exam can be carried out in a fair manner and without including extra costs. This means that for a given exam, all students must take the same exam at the same time. Other SLU sites should be selected first.

A student may take an exam at another location because they:

  • have special reasons to do so – see section 8.6 Special reasons;
  • are studying abroad through an exchange programme;
  • have studied at SLU through an exchange programme but are now in another country;
  • are studying at another SLU site than where the examination is held.

Who is responsible for what?

Examinations at other locations

The student must contact the examiner or course coordinator with their request (see the correct form under Links). When applying to take an exam at another location, they must investigate whether the exam will be held in a specific room and if there will be an invigilator there.

Before every examination, the examiner must decide if SLU will allow a student to take an exam at another location. It is not enough if the student has reason to do so – it must also be fair, and resources must be considered.

The course coordinator decides whether to change the examination location or time, and they are responsible to inform the students of any changes.

Instructions

Information on how students apply to take an exam.

Links

Blankett för ansökan om tentamen på annan ort (form to apply to take an exam at another location)

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8.3 Rules for written examinations

This section concerns written examinations (on paper or digital) at the responsible department in question. Other rules may apply for contracted courses, joint programmes with other higher education institutions or exams taken at another higher education institution.

Policy

Written examinations must be carried out in such a way that the student identities are unknown to the examiner when they assess the answers. However, the invigilators must check and document which students are taking the exam.

SLU rules

Compulsory examination application

See section 8.2 Examination times, locations and registration.

Training to become an invigilator and receiving a certificate

All invigilators must have completed and passed special training. However, the academic year 2018/19 acts as a transitional period where it is possible to work as an invigilator even if you have not passed the training. An invigilator must also submit a written certificate confirming that they have read and agree to follow the current examination rules at SLU.

After 1 September 2019, examiner or co-grading teachers are not allowed to act as invigilators.

Number of invigilators

The number of invigilators is based on the number of students during an exam session:

  • normally, there must at least two (2) invigilators during written examinations;
  • there must be at least three (3) invigilators when more than sixty (60) students have applied to take an exam and there is no toilet in the exam room;
  • if less than six (6) students have applied to take an exam, one (1) invigilator may be enough.
  • invigilators must arrive at the exam room in good time to allow the exam to start at the given time;
  • students must arrive at the exam room in good time;
  • students who arrive after the given time may have to wait up to 30 minutes before being let in;
  • students who arrive more than 30 minutes late may not take the exam;
  • no students may leave the exam room during the first 45 minutes of the exam.
Examination time rules
Before an examination starts

The student must do the following:

  • Bring their own writing material (pens and rulers); no other aids may be used unless the course coordinator or examiner have allowed specific exceptions. Where applicable, the exam/form must list which aids are allowed.
  • Provide identification when arriving to take the exam.
  • Take note of their assigned anonymity code which they must write on each paper they submit. See section Anonymity codes below.
  • Follow the invigilator’s instructions on where to sit.
  • Take out everything they may need and are allowed from their bags or equivalent, and then place the bags and clothing at a given location. During the exam, students may only open their bags within the presence of an invigilator.
  • Turn off their mobile phones and other electronic equipment and place them in their bags, where they must remain during the whole exam. Electronic equipment that has been approved as aids may lie on the table.
  • Leave their identification visible on the table during the whole exam. Bulky belongings that obscure the view, such as plastic bags, lunchboxes, pencil-boxes, eyeglass cases, wallets, etc., may not lie on the table during the exam.

The invigilator must:

  • check student identification when they arrive – after 1 September 2019, only students who applied may take an exam;
  • provide students with an anonymity code if they did not receive one when applying to take the exam – see section Anonymity codes below;
  • assign students their seats – free seating is not allowed;
  • Provide information on the following:
    • what is allowed on the table and where students should put other personal belongings during the exam;
    • how students can contact the course coordinator or examiner during the exam, where applicable;
    • whether there will be a break and if so, when and where it will take place.
  • hand out paper to write on – it is the only paper students are allowed to use;
  • hand out the exam to all students who applied to take the exam in question.
During the examination

The room must be orderly and quiet during the exam. Students may not speak to each other.

If necessary, an invigilator can demand that a student change their seat during the exam.

When there are two or more invigilators in the room, one must be seated in front of the students and one behind them. If there is only one invigilator, they must be seated in front of the students.

Invigilators must stay focused on the students and walk around the room at appropriate intervals.

Invigilators are not allowed to disturb the students. This also applies when an invigilator speaks to another employee or a specific student during the exam.

Invigilators, course coordinators and/or examiners may check any aids and a student’s personal belongings on the table at any time.

If the toilet is not directly connected to the exam room, an invigilator must accompany the student and wait outside.

Students may be granted shorter breaks under the supervision of an invigilator. During these breaks, students and invigilators may not speak.

Submitting an exam

Students are not allowed to leave the room permanently without submitting their exam. They must submit their exam to the invigilator even if the exam is blank.

Every student must provide identification when submitting an exam.

All submitted loose papers must include the student’s anonymity code. The invigilator must count and take note of the number of submitted papers. See section Anonymity codes below.

If secrecy applies, this must be included on the exam. In these cases, all given examination material must be submitted when the exam is complete. Also see section 8.9 Feedback and handing back written examinations

After the exam is finished, the invigilator must submit all student papers, the student list and code list in accordance with the instructions for the exam session in question. See section Anonymity codes below.

Adjusted examinations

Students may sometimes request examination adjustments. In order to do so, they need a recommendation from a learning support coordinator.

Adjusted examinations may for example mean giving the student longer time to take the exam, the use of a computer with voice synthesis and spell check, allowing them to take the exam in a smaller group or dividing it into two sessions. See section 3.5 Study with a disability.

Students with decisions and recommendations from SLU regarding learning support who wish to adjust their examination must contact the course coordinator or course administrator in good time – preferably when the course starts, but no later than fifteen (15) weekdays before the examination takes place. The examiner decides if and how to adjust an exam.

It can be difficult for students who take adjusted exams to remain anonymous, but it must be done as much as possible.

Emergency evacuation

If there is an emergency evacuation (e.g. fire alarm), all students must leave the room in accordance with the invigilator’s and/or the person in charge instructions. The exam is concluded immediately during an evacuation.

The invigilator must inform the examiner or course coordinator that the exam was interrupted. The examiner then decides whether to assess the submitted exams.

Students must be offered another chance to take the exam. It counts as the exam session that was forced to be interrupted due to evacuation. See section 8.10 Alternative examination session. The course coordinator is responsible to inform the students when the alternative session will take place.

Suspected cheating

If an invigilator discovers or suspects that a student is cheating, i.e. is using prohibited aids or other forms of deception during the exam, the invigilator must:

  • note the student’s name and personal identity number;
  • encourage the student to submit any evidence;
  • note their version of events and
  • report the event in writing to the head of department at the responsible department (see the correct form under Links).

The invigilator is not allowed to force the student to submit any evidence. Body searches or other coercive measures are not allowed.

When suspected of cheating, a student may not be dismissed or forced to stop taking the exam.

There will be a special investigation of the event following the exam. Disciplinary measures and management of disciplinary cases are described in section 10.4 Disciplinary measures.

Disorderly conduct

If a student acts disorderly or obstructively during an exam, they may be asked to leave the room immediately. The invigilator must report the event in writing to the head of department at the responsible department.

There will be a special investigation of the event following the exam. Disciplinary measures and management of disciplinary cases are described in section 10.4 Disciplinary measures.

Anonymity codes

At the beginning of every exam, each student must be given an anonymity code which they must write on every loose paper they intend to submit. If the students were not given anonymity codes when they applied to the take the exam, an invigilator must ensure that all anonymity codes can be found on a code list, which must match each student with a code. The code list is sealed in an envelope and signed by one of the students.

In addition to the code list, there must be a student list – an invigilator must note when each student submits an exam, if they provided identification and the number of papers submitted.

After an exam session ends, both lists (the code list and list with submissions) must be delivered to the responsible department or equivalent in accordance with the instructions for the exam session in question. The code list must then be stored in a safe manner until the results have been decided.

When the results are made public on paper or on the course page, the student codes (not names and/or personal identity numbers) must be published together with the results.

The envelope containing the codes is opened after the results have been made public. When the envelope is opened, a student or someone outside the course management must confirm that the envelope was unopened by signing it.

The responsible department must archive course and exam information in accordance with section 8.8 Reporting results and documentation.

Links

Handläggningsrutiner vid misstanke om fusk vid SLU (administrative procedures for suspicion of cheating at SLU)

Form for reporting suspected cheating

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8.4 Other types of examination (tests)

Important concepts

When writing a take-home examination, the student is not monitored and they often do not sit on SLU premises.

Written assignments are projects, etc. carried out by individual students or groups. The purpose of the assignment is to submit a basis for an examination assessment.

SLU rules

Oral examinations

Oral examinations may be recorded to facilitate documentation. In those cases, students must be informed beforehand. It also possible to include several persons during an oral examination – e.g. one takes the exam and another observes.

Written assignments and take-home examinations

The student is personally responsible to submit a written assignment or a take-home examination to the examiner before the deadline. Assignments submitted after the deadline do not need to be assessed before the next examination session, but the student is still considered to have used two examination sessions. If special reasons (see section 8.6 Special reasons) or systematic problems cause the student to miss the deadline, the examiner should assess the assignment or examination anyway.

It must be clearly stated if the student is expected to write their assignment or take-home examination alone. The examiner can request that the student orally accounts their individual performance afterwards.

Student answers to a take-home examination must be checked in Urkund (or equivalent). The examiner is responsible for this.

Independent projects (degree projects)

See chapter 9. Independent project (degree project).

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8.5 Compulsory steps

Important concepts

Compulsory steps (such as obligations, compulsory attendance, compulsory participation) can apply to placements, laboratory sessions, seminars, excursions or visits to clinics.

Policy

Compulsory elements must be justifiable in relation to the intended course learning outcomes.

SLU rules

General information

The course syllabus must state if a course contain compulsory steps, and all requirements to pass the course in question must be clarified no later than when the course starts. See section 7.4 Course start. After that, compulsory steps are normally not allowed to be moved or added to the timetable.

In exceptional cases, compulsory steps can be moved after the course starts, but in those cases students who cannot participate because of the change must be allowed to submit a supplementary assignment during the course period.

Right to teaching

A student who has been admitted to and registered on a course is entitled to receive teaching and/or supervision during the course they were admitted to.

Students that cannot participate in a compulsory step due to special reasons (see section 8.6 Special reasons) must be given the opportunity make this up in an appropriate manner – the examiner decides how. If possible, this will occur during the course date in question, but certain compulsory steps cannot be carried out until the next course date. See section 8.5 Compulsory steps.

A student who is absent during a compulsory step without giving special reasons cannot expect to be offered a special solution to the problems that may follow.

The possibility to make up compulsory steps may be limited if a course is cancelled. See section 8.5 Compulsory steps.

Replacement assignments

The examiner may decide that a supplementary assignment can replace compulsory steps, if there are reasons for this and if it is possible with regard to the intended learning outcomes and resources of the course. The content and scope of the assignment must correspond to the step it is replacing.

Future course dates

A student’s absence from a compulsory step may mean that they have to take part of the missed step during a future course date.

  • a student who had special reasons for their absence (see section 8.6 Special reasons) during the first course date is entitled to participate in the missed step at a future course date;
  • students who cannot give special reasons for their absence during the first course date can take part of missed steps at future course dates, provided there is space.
Cancelled course

In connection with a decision to cancel a course, transitional rules must be established for how compulsory steps may be completed by students who did not pass the course. The scope of these measures depends on how many students are affected and what types of compulsory steps are included.

Students affected by a cancelled course must be offered at least one opportunity to fulfill compulsory requirements within two years of the final course date.

If there are special reasons, a student may be given a further opportunity to complete compulsory steps. Accepted reasons are listed in section 8.6 Special reasons, and they can also include longer periods of studies abroad.

Who is responsible for what?

When a course is cancelled, the same authority that decided the course syllabus or revisions to the course syllabus must also decide the transitional rules. See section 6.2 Course syllabus.

In regard to programme students, the responsible department, in consultation with the programme director of studies, must inform the affected students how they can complete compulsory steps when a course is cancelled.

Students who wish for further opportunities to complete compulsory steps must submit a written, justified request. The responsible faculty (belonging to the responsible department) decides whether to offer further opportunities. The decision is made by a person within faculty management responsible for education at first- and second-cycle level, unless the faculty decides something else.

Instructions

Students who wish to take part of teaching, including compulsory steps, after the first course date (to which they were registered) has passed, must be re-registered. Re-registration may also be done for a course which is no longer being offered. If a student only wants to retake an exam, they do not need to be re-registered. However, they must apply to take the exam as usual.

Transitional rules must be included in the course syllabus. See section 6.2 Course syllabus. Also see section 8.12 Renewed examination (retake session) limitations.

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8.6 Special reasons

Important concepts

The education planning and administration handbook often includes the term special reasons. Unless otherwise specified, “special reasons” comprise the following:

  • personal illness or accident
  • medical reasons connect to personal pregnancy
  • family matters
  • extended family matters
  • adjusted study path due to documented disability
  • student union commission
  • public commission
  • civil or total defence services.

Family matters refers to the birth of a child, temporary care of a sick child, and serious illnesses as well as deaths and funerals within the immediate family. Serious illness refers to an illness which requires the student to be present. The student’s immediate family includes the student’s spouse, common law spouse, children and common law spouse’s children.

Extended family matters refers to more serious illness, imminent or occurred deaths, and funerals within the extended family. More serious illness means life-threatening or acute illnesses requiring the student’s presence. The student’s extended family includes the student’s parents, parents-in-law, grandparents, foster parents and siblings. The common law spouse’s parents are regarded as parents-in-law.

Student union commission refers to an assignment as student representative in one of SLU’s, Sluss’ and cooperation bodies.

Public commission refers to a commission (not employment) as lay judge, a commission at a national or municipal authority, or a commission related to general or municipal elections.

Who is responsible for what?

If possible, the student should notify the responsible department (course coordinator or equivalent) in advance if they cannot take an exam or take part of a compulsory step because of special reasons.

If necessary, the course coordinator or examiner may request documentation to corroborate the student’s claim regarding a special reason.

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8.7 Grading decisions 

Policy

After taking an exam, student performance must be assessed as soon as possible.

National regulations

The basic principle is that a favourable decision may not be changed to a less favourable one for the individual.[1]

Changes to a grade
  • “[...] on rectification of a typographical error, miscalculation or similar oversight concerning a grade shall be made by an examiner.”[2] Such changes may involve either a raising or a lowering of the grade.
  • Grades (and other decisions) may be negatively changed if it is discovered that a mistake has been made because of other circumstances than a “typographical error, miscalculation or similar oversight”. This applies in cases where cheating has been discovered.
  • Corrections which are unfavourable for a student must be made with great caution and only in very clear-cut cases. Before any such correction is made, the student is normally given the opportunity to make a statement.
  • Grading decisions are not included in decisions that can be appealed[3], but a student has the right to ask the examiner for a reassessment.
  • “If an examiner finds that a decision on a grade is obviously incorrect owing to new circumstances or for some other reason, he or she shall change the decision if this can be done quickly and easily and if it does not mean lowering the grade.”[4]
Reassessing grades

SLU rules

The examiner decides on grades – see section 4.5 Examiner – and must provide the examination results:

  • no later than 15 weekdays after the scheduled examination and
  • at least 10 weekdays before the retake session.
Reassessing grades

A student who wishes to have their grade reassessed must submit their request as soon as possible, and include a reason why they want the reassessment. (See the correct form under Links).

Renewed examination during reassessment: see section 8.11 Renewed examination (retake session).

Who is responsible for what?

The examiner who decided the grade must also decide any changes to that grade. In exceptional cases, another examiner can be appointed to decide on such a change.

Instructions

In accordance with the Higher Education Ordinance, only very incorrect decisions must be reassessed. Normally, the issue is not to make a new assessment of an already assessed examination. A reassessment example is when, during a written examination, a student has written their answer to a certain question in the space where another answer is supposed to be, and this has not been acknowledged before.

Links

Blankett för begäran om omprövning av betyg (form to request a grade reassessment) 

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8.8 Reporting results and documentation

Important concepts

A course module is a part of a course in the form of credits. It was previously called a module or test in Ladok. A course module can consist of several result notes.

Policy

Examination results must be reported in Ladok as soon as possible.

SLU rules

Examination results must be reported in Ladok no later than three weekdays after the requirements have been met. However, during the period 1 July–15 August and 24 December–6 January, the reporting of results may take up to seven weekdays.

The examination date must be included in Ladok. Consequently, it is not the date when the examiner has completed their assessment of the student’s performance and determined the grade that is stated in Ladok.

Failed examination results must also be reported in Ladok. Examination results for courses that are not divided into course modules can only be reported when all examinations have been completed.

Several result notes relating to a course module can be entered in Ladok. See section 6.6 Course modules. When all results have been reported, the course module is listed as passed in Ladok.

There are specific rules for independent projects (degree projects). See chapter 9. Independent project (degree project)..

Who is responsible for what?

The grading decision must specify who the examiner was. The decision must also specify any other teachers who participated in the assessment (co-grading teachers).

The responsible department must archive bases for the examination in accordance with Annex 4: Archiving course information.

Instructions

Example of how to manage failed results in Ladok:

Examination session

 Student performance

Ladok report

Module

Course

Examination

U

U

Nothing is reported

Examination

Blank examination was submitted

U

Nothing is reported

Examination

Did not take the exam

Nothing is reported

Nothing is reported

Degree project

Supplementary assignment required

Nothing is reported

Nothing is reported

Degree project

Passed, but the grade can be raised if the student submits a supplementary assignment

G

G (can be changed if the student submits a supplementary assignment)

Written assignment

U

U

Nothing is reported

Examination

G

G

 

Written assignment

Did not submit anything

Nothing is reported

Nothing is reported

Examination

G

G

 

Written assignment

Submitted too late

U*

Nothing is reported

Examination

G

G

 

Compulsory step

Did not participate

Nothing is reported

Nothing is reported

Examination

G

G

 

*If there is a deadline, assignments/take-home examinations submitted after the deadline has passed can count as a used exam session. In those cases, U must be reported in Ladok.

Courses with only one module: module grade = grade for the whole course. However, the grade U does not need to be reported in Ladok for the whole course, just the module.

 

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8.9 Feedback and handing back written examinations 

Policy

The responsible department (examiner or course coordinator) running a course should offer students the chance to provide examination feedback.

National regulations

Feedback

The student has the right to:

  • discuss issues concerning the exam assessment with the examiner;
  • learn why they received the grade they did and
  • be informed about what, if anything, remains before a pass grade can be issued for the course.
Issuing exam questions

When an examination has concluded, each examination question becomes a public document. Secrecy may be applied to such questions connected to cases listed in the Public Access to Information and Secrecy Act.

Issuing exam answers

A written examination (a student’s answer to examination questions) that does need any more processing may be handed back to the student in question.

SLU rules

Issuing exam questions

If secrecy is an issue when handing back exam answers, the course coordinator must inform students of this through a special decision, following consultation with Legal Affairs.

Issuing exam answers

Before the original exam containing the student’s answers is issued, the student has the right to receive a copy if they request it. This may for example be appropriate if the student wishes to have the examiner’s decision reassessed. The student thereby avoids any suspicion that changes or additions were made to the original after it was handed back. The department has the right to charge a copying fee. See section 3.8 Student costs and reimbursements.

Who is responsible for what?

The responsible department must decide how examination feedback should be designed. This may occur outside the course period, but before the first retake session. When assessment has concluded, the department is also responsible for issuing the written exams (student answers to an exam) to the students in a controlled manner. For example, the department must ensure that unauthorised persons do not have access to student answers.

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8.10 Alternative examination session 

SLU rules

The responsible department must offer an alternative examination session to students if anything of the following happens:

  • the student is a student representative on an SLU body, and they notify the person in charge that a scheduled examination session will coincide with an advertised meeting or other activity relating to the body;
  • a scheduled examination session cannot be carried out due to circumstances that SLU are responsible for;
  • a student’s answers to an exam or equivalent go missing due to a mistake made by SLU.

Alternative examination sessions must be offered no later than a week after the scheduled examination session, or no later than a week after the discovery that a student’s answers to an exam have gone missing.

The exact time for the alternative examination session must be decided following consultation with the affected student.

There are special rules for compulsory steps. See section 8.5 Compulsory steps.

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8.11 Renewed examination (retake session)

Policy

SLU offers three examination sessions per year:

  1. an ordinary examination within the course date in question;
  2. renewed examination (the first retake session), in connection with the course date;
  3. another examination within a year after the course starts.

SLU rules

General information

Renewed examination rules also apply to oral exams, take-home examinations, written assignments or equivalent.

Renewed examination must be offered 10–25 weekdays after the results of the ordinary examination have been announced – i.e. no later than 40 weekdays after the ordinary exam was held. Courses that take place during the latter part of the spring semester (period 4) may schedule retake sessions in August.

Retake sessions connected to specific course dates are only offered if the students in question need to take the exam at that point.

Another retake session must be offered within a year after the course starts, regardless whether students from the latest course date need it or not.

When an exam is renewed, other students from previous course dates are allowed to participate.

There are special rules for compulsory steps and independent projects (degree projects). See section 8.5 Compulsory steps and chapter 9. Independent project (degree project)..

Retake sessions during reassessment

An ongoing examination must be concluded (in the form of grades/results) before the student can take another, renewed, exam.

Students who have requested a reassessment of an exam they failed may take a renewed exam while the reassessment of the first exam takes place, but the renewed exam will not be assessed before the first reassessment is completed.

If the student receives a pass grade following a reassessment, the renewed exam is disregarded. If the student still has a fail grade following reassessment, the renewed exam is assessed.

Who is responsible for what?

The responsible department must:

  • when the course starts, give the date for any renewed examination (the first retake session), in connection with the course date;
  • no later than eight (8) weeks beforehand, give the date for another renewed examination, which must be offered within a year after the course starts.

Students must apply for retake sessions at least 10 weekdays before the exam takes place. See section 8.2 Examination times, locations and registration.

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8.12 Renewed examination (retake session) limitations

Important concepts

Examination sessions count as the number of times a student has taken an exam connected to a specific course or step. An exam which the student has started counts as a spent exam session.

A course module is a part of a course in the form of credits. It was previously called a module or test in Ladok.

National regulations

Students are given the right to take an exam related to a specific course five times. “If satisfactory completion of a course or part of a course requires successful completion by the student of a placement or corresponding training, the number of prescribed periods of placement or corresponding training shall be at least two.”[1]

The total number of exam sessions and placements may only be limited if not doing so would lead to an unreasonable waste of resources. Any such limitation of the total amount of exam sessions must be specified in the course syllabus.

SLU rules

Changes to reading lists and grading criteria

Exams are geared towards the intended learning outcomes of the course and drawn up in accordance with current reading lists (or equivalent) as well as with current grading criteria, including specified requirements for a pass grade.

An examiner may decide to make an exception for a student who was admitted to an earlier course date, if there are reasons for it.

Changes to course modules

If by dividing a course into modules affects the exam, it must primarily take place in accordance with the new division of modules. If this is not possible, the affected students must be offered at least five exam sessions in accordance with the modules that applied when they were admitted to the course.

Changes to a course syllabus

If a new or revised course syllabus is adopted, the course syllabus in question[2] must also include transitional rules for how exams can be completed by a student who was admitted under a previous course syllabus and did not achieve a pass grade.

Examinations should primarily be carried out in accordance with the new course syllabus. However, adjustments may need to be made in order for the objectives in the previous course syllabus to be met.

Cancelled course

If a course is cancelled, the overall transitional rule is that at least three retake sessions must be offered within two years of the last course date. In total, students from the latest course date must be offered at least five retake sessions on a course they have been admitted to.

If there are special reasons, a student may be given the opportunity of another retake session within a cancelled course. Accepted reasons are listed in section 8.6 Special reasons, but they can also include longer periods of studies abroad.

Students who wish for another retake session on a course that has been cancelled – in addition to what is stated in the transitional rules – must submit a written and justified request to the responsible faculty. The responsible faculty (belonging to the responsible department) decides whether to offer further opportunities. The decision is made by a person within faculty management responsible for education at first- and second-cycle level, unless the faculty decides something else.

Compulsory steps

See section 8.5 Compulsory steps.

Who is responsible for what?

The responsible department must provide information on their course pages regarding the possibility to retake an exam for the following reasons:

  • changes to course modules
  • changes to a course syllabus and
  • transitional rules for cancelled courses.

If necessary, students must keep up to date with:

  • changes to reading lists, grading criteria, course modules and course syllabus which affect examinations, and
  • transitional rules for examinations related to cancelled courses.

When a course is cancelled, the responsible faculty must decide whether to offer another exam session – in addition to what is stated in the transitional rules. The responsible faculty (belonging to the responsible department) decides whether to offer further opportunities. The decision is made by a person within faculty management responsible for education at first- and second-cycle level, unless the faculty decides something else.

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9. Independent project (degree project)

9.1 Starting points
9.2 Course syllabus
9.3 Work plan
9.4 Implementation organisation

9.1 Starting points

Important concepts

At SLU, we use the term independent project or degree project. The term Master’s thesis can be used for independent projects (degree projects) of at least 30 credits at second-cycle level. In this chapter, independent project is used. Bachelor’s essays (G2E) are at first-cycle level and Master’s theses (A2E) are at second-cycle level.

Policy

As of the autumn semester 2018, the same wording is used in all course syllabuses for independent projects. The intended course learning outcomes for independent projects have been worded in line with the qualification requirements. Independent projects are handled in accordance with the same procedures and responsibilities as other higher education.

Independent projects at first-cycle level can be carried out individually or in pairs. If it is done in pairs, it must be possible to assess individual student efforts.

Independent projects at Master’s level are normally carried out individually. Course coordinators can make exceptions.

National regulations

The annex to the Ordinance for the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences contains a complete list of all degrees SLU offer.[1] “A requirement for the award of a Higher Education Diploma is completion by the student of an independent project (degree project) within the requirements of the programme.”

All independent projects must follow a course syllabus, just like other courses. See chapter 6. Course syllabus and course dates.

SLU rules

An independent project can only be classified into one main field of study (subject). Double classification is never allowed. See SLU’s examination procedures for a complete list of degrees and main fields of study. Programme syllabuses for programmes that lead to professional qualifications include specific requirements.

At SLU, we use the same wording in all course syllabuses for independent projects.[2] Each programme board can add programme-specific intended learning outcomes, both for professional and general qualifications. However, this must be done restrictively and only if it is vital to add something which is not included in the joint intended learning outcomes. The Board of Education approves any exemptions.

An independent project carried out and assessed at another higher education institution can be transferred and included in an SLU qualification if it meets the objectives and other requirements for the intended qualification.

Links

Lokal examensordning – regler för examina på grundnivå och avancerad nivå vid SLU (SLU’s examination procedures for first cycle and second cycle level – only in Swedish). Includes teaching and research duties for SLU’s main fields of study)

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9.2 Course syllabus

Important concepts

Joint independent project wording at SLU is included in Slukurs.

Policy

All independent projects must be checked for plagiarism (in Urkund) and published within the framework of SLU’s electronic publishing system, Epsilon. The amount of supervision (in hours) must be included under additional information in the course syllabus.

SLU rules

Level and scope

Independent projects are offered at the following level and scope:

  • G2E, 15 credits (Bachelor’s essay)
  • A2E, 30 credits (Master’s project)
  • A2E, 60 credits (Master’s project), when decided by the programme board
Entry requirements

Entry requirements for joint independent project wording at SLU are included in Slukurs.

First-cycle level (G2E)

Knowledge equivalent of 120 credits, of which 60 credits within the main field of study. At least one course at specialisation level G2F must be carried out in connection with an independent project. At least one course relevant to the project subject must be carried out before carrying out an independent project. 

Second–cycle level (A2E)

Knowledge equivalent of 30 credits at second-cycle level within the main field of study. Independent project with a pass grade at first-cycle level or a Bachelor’s degree. At least one course relevant to the project subject must be carried out before carrying out an independent project. English knowledge corresponding to English 6.

Approved entry requirements exemptions:

  • Veterinary students admitted to the Veterinary Medicine programme VY009.[1]
  • The entry requirements for the main fields of study business administration (first- and second-cycle level) and environmental sciences (second-cycle level) must include method knowledge (at least 5 credits) in the independent project course syllabuses.[2]
Language

General qualifications

  • Bachelor’s project – course language: Swedish (main rule).
  • Master’s project – course language: English (main rule).
  • Programme boards can decide to offer Bachelor’s projects in English (requires a new course syllabus).
  • Programme boards can decide to offer Master’s projects in Swedish (requires a new course syllabus).

Professional qualifications

  • Professional programme – course language: Swedish, but the project can be written in English.
  • The Board of Education approves joint wording for course syllabuses (joint objectives, entry requirements, etc.).[3]
  • The Board of Education approves any exemptions. They are subsequently listed in the course syllabus in question.
  • Each programme board then establishes their course syllabuses. Programme-specific intended learning outcomes may be added, but restrictively.

Who is responsible for what?

  • The Board of Education approves joint wording for course syllabuses (joint objectives, entry requirements, etc.).[1]
  • The Board of Education approves any exemptions. They are subsequently listed in the course syllabus in question.
  • Each programme board then establishes their course syllabuses. Programme-specific intended learning outcomes may be added, but restrictively.

Instructions

See chapter 6. Course syllabus and course dates.

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9.3 Work plan

SLU rules

The student must write a work plan, following consultation with their supervisor, as soon as possible. This is done to facilitate planning and implementation of the independent project within the given timeframe. The work plan can include the following information:

Project description:
  • Preliminary title
  • Background/problem description
  • Purpose and issue/hypothesis
  • Material and method
  • Implementation and demarcation
  • Form of presentation
  • project beginning;
  • collection period, revision and compilation of the material, editing text/pictures;
  • handing in the preliminary version to the supervisor;
  • handing in the project to the examiner;
  • presentation preparation (assessment) and public discussion and examination;
  • final presentation;
  • possible completion and handing in the final version to the examiner.
  • If there are special reasons, a student may be allowed to change subject (within the main field of study) during the current course date. This is dealt with in the same way as a revision of the work plan.
  • Possibilities for changing independent project subject are limited by the availability of supervisors.
  • The deadline specified in the work plan counts as the first exam session;
  • An exam session is regarded as spent if the project is not handed in by the deadline specified in the work plan;
  • The work plan may not limit a student’s right to submit their independent project even if the schedule is not followed.
Schedule, including the dates when the following happens:
Change of independent project subject
Deadline
After a course ends

If a student did not achieve a pass grade, occasional supervision may be offered after the course ends. Regardless of whether the student receives further supervision or not, they are entitled to a renewed final assessment.

Who is responsible for what?

The supervisor confirms that the work plan has been written in consultation with the student. The student and course coordinator, who represent SLU, approve the work plan.

If the work plan cannot be followed, the student and supervisor must jointly revise it or write a new one. The supervisor and student must propose the revised work plan and notify the course coordinator. The course coordinator must approve a revised work plan.

Links

There are examples of work plans and agreements between external partners/organisations on the SLU web.

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9.4 Implementation organisation 

Important concepts

Independent projects can be carried out in two ways: with a joint course start, teaching steps and joint conclusion or without. Both alternatives must meet the objectives and requirements in the course syllabus in question. Also see Instructions.

Policy

Before the beginning an independent project, students have the right to be clearly informed of what is expected of them and what support is available. This applies to teaching, number of supervision hours, library support and any other resources such as laboratory, computer and workplace access, etc. It cannot be expected that the student carries out other tasks than those connected to an independent project and the intended learning outcomes in the course syllabus.

SLU rules

Admission, registration

A student is registered on an independent project course after their registration form (individual or course-date specific) is signed by the course coordinator or the person delegated by the course coordinator. It must also be checked if the student meets the entry requirements.

Grading criteria

There must be clear grading criteria for independent projects, just as for other courses. Each programme board decides whether to use the SLU-wide grading criteria for independent projects. The grading criteria will state if it is possible to receive higher than a pass grade (4 and 5).

The deadline specified in the work plan counts as the first exam session, but the work plan may be revised. If there are special reasons (see section 8.6 Special reasons), or other reasons related to the project which are beyond the student’s control, and the revision is done before the original deadline for the project, it must still be possible to receive higher than a pass grade (4 and 5, where applicable).

Student remuneration

If the student receives financial remuneration from SLU or externally, this is regulated in a special agreement. Where applicable, this is an agreement between the student and the external partner.

Supervision

A student has the right to 10 hours of supervision for an independent project of 15 credits, and 20 hours for a project of 30 credits. Supervision can occur individually or in a group.

Change of supervisor
  • If there are special reasons, a student may be allowed to change supervisor. The student must submit a written request, specifying their reasons, to the course coordinator (or equivalent), who then decides on a possible change of supervisor, unless the head of department has said otherwise.
  • The possibility of changing supervisors is limited by the availability of supervisors.
Presentation

Examination formats and requirements to pass a course are listed in the course syllabus.

  • all independent projects must include a summary in English;
  • at second-cycle level, all independent projects must include a popular science description in Swedish or English;
  • all independent projects must be presented orally, and each student must at least publically discuss and examine one other independent project.
Assessment and grade

The same examination and grading deadlines that apply to other courses apply to independent projects as well. See chapter 8. Examination (tests) and compulsory steps. In addition, examiners can decide that completion is allowed after the deadline has passed, and that it counts as part of the examination session. Such supplementary work may affect the grade for the independent project, provided it is done before the grading decision has been made.

Independent projects must be reported in Ladok with the original title and the title in English (translation). This means that for projects written in English, only the English title is required. For projects written in Swedish, a translation of the title in English is required.

Publication

Independent projects with a pass grade must be published in SLU’s electronic publishing tool, Epsilon.

The SLU library can provide document templates and publishing advice. See Annex 7: What must be included on the front and title page of independent projects (degree projects) at SLU to learn more.

The course coordinator is responsible for ensuring that the administrator receives the final version of the passed project. The administrator uploads projects with a pass grade in Epsilon, and the library reviews bibliographic information before publication.

The supervisor or external partner cannot control the process of making the independent project public since it is in opposition to the Freedom of the Press Act and the Public Access to Information and Secrecy Act. In exceptional cases, publication can be postponed (reading embargo):[1]

In principle, independent projects should be published immediately after receiving a pass grade. In exceptional cases, publication may be delayed for twelve (12) months. The relevant department decides what is best. If there are special reasons, publication can be delayed over 12 months. In such cases, publication is delayed gradually – 6 months at a time – until the purpose for the delay has been resolved. Publication delays over 12 months require a special decision from the faculty in question. The work plan can include possible publication delay.

Changes to independent projects published in Epsilon are only allowed in special cases. Examples: fact or format errors which affect readability, or offences to the law. Supplementary documentation in the form of corrections (an errata page) should be chosen instead of changing the file.

Publications can only be removed from the web (depublication) completely if there are special reasons. Special reasons for depublication can be plagiarism or offences to the law. Annex 8: Depublication process for pdf-files already published in Epsilon contains information on work flow and who does what. Annex 9: Changing a pdf file already published in Epsilon describes how to make changes to an already published file.

Who is responsible for what?

Student

The student is responsible for writing a work plan and schedule in consultation with their supervisor. The student carries out their independent project with the aim to meet the intended learning outcomes. The student initiates meetings with their supervisor in accordance with the stipulated supervision hours (10 hours/15 credits or 20 hours/30 credits). A student’s right to supervision only concerns a specific course date.

Supervisor

The supervisor’s function is to supervise the student to help them meet the intended learning outcomes. The supervisor should inform the student of the available number of supervision hours, help them plan their independent project and co-write their work plan. A supervisor can supervise several students within the same course date. In certain cases, a student is allowed several supervisors – one must act as the principal supervisor, the others as assistant supervisors. If necessary, the supervisor must submit bases for assessment to the examiner. If a student did not achieve a pass grade, occasional supervision may be offered after the course ends.

Head of department

The head of department at the department where the principal supervisor works is responsible for ensuring that there are supervision resources.

Examiner

The examiner and supervisor cannot be the same person. The examiner assesses and grades a student’s independent project, using the intended course learning outcomes and grading criteria as the starting point. The examiner must make the grading decision without any influence from the supervisor. If necessary, the examiner can require bases for assessment from the supervisor. If several students have written an independent project, the assessment of student performance must be individual. If necessary, the examiner may request that each student provides a report of their individual work on an independent project.

Students who do not receive a pass grade for the course date in question have the right to be reassessed in the same manner as for other courses.

Course coordinator

The course coordinator has a general role and coordinating function at department level, and they approve the work plan. The course coordinator is contacted if, for example, there are cooperation problems or if the student wishes to change subject or supervisor. The course coordinator is also responsible for applying course evaluation procedures on independent projects.

External partners

Agreements with external partners are made through separate agreements, and between SLU and the partner in question, not the student (any remuneration exempted). In cases where the student carries out their project externally and has an external supervisor, they must also have a principal supervisor at SLU who is responsible for ensuring that the project is carried out in accordance with SLU guidelines and a course syllabus.

Instructions

Independent projects can be included in the following:

a) a course with joint beginning, teaching steps and conclusion.

In courses with established course components, supervision can be individual or in a group, as well as scheduled.

b) a course without a joint beginning and teaching steps.

It is very important to write and follow a work plan when students carry out an independent project alone without an established course date (e.g. within a research project, abroad or with an external client). Other teaching steps may also be included in these independent projects; the work plan states how to carry them out.

Archiving

As of the autumn semester 2018, all independent projects are digitally archived in Public 360.[2] The published version in Epsilon is downloaded automatically. This means that independent projects published in Epsilon will be preserved. Preservation occurs in accordance with the governing document Strategi för bevarande av elektroniska handlingar (strategy for preserving electronic documents).[3] The responsible department is responsible for archiving and ensuring that independent projects are published in Epsilon, i.e. meet the publication and archiving requirements. The library is responsible for technological solutions.

Links

SLU’s document templates for student works contain the following:

  • front and title pages (Swedish)
  • front and title pages (English) 
  • content/insert (regardless of language)
  • instructions for the insert template.

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Tillbaka till dokumentets början

10. Cheating and disciplinary measures 

10.1 Cheating and plagiarism
10.2 Inform and prevent
10.3 Discover and intervene
10.4 Disciplinary measures

10.1 Cheating and plagiarism

Cheating and plagiarism

Important concepts

What is cheating?

Examples of cheating:

  • using prohibited aids during written examinations;
  • altering an already assessed examination;
  • unauthorised collaboration between students regarding individual written assignments;
  • copying other students’ assignments;
  • including extracts without citing a source;
  • fabricating information, i.e. making up facts without evidence;
  • falsely stating presence at compulsory teaching components;
  • claiming false study performance relevant to credit transfer assessment.

In order for something to be considered cheating, it must be misleading, which requires intent. The student in question must have intentionally tried to deceive the teacher.

This requires the following:

  • the student was deliberate (did not make a mistake or act carelessly);
  • the student knew that the conduct in question was prohibited and
  • that it was included in an examination or other task with the aim of assessing study performance.
What is plagiarism?

Plagiarism is copying another person’s texts or reproducing tables, images and other illustrations without naming the source. Plagiarism is also reproducing a text thoroughly without marking it as a quote, even if the source is stated.

Policy

SLU’s objective is to allow students to have an independent and critical approach to knowledge as well as develop general expertise in preparation for their professional careers. One student-activating tool is pedagogy – it develops students’ ability to find, assess and use information in a critical and scientific manner. Both the objective and working method require good knowledge of rules for academic writing.

Both student and teachers require clear guidelines, especially in connection with various forms of examination.

All suspicions of cheating must be followed up with appropriate measures. See section 10.3 Discover and intervene.

During follow-up, the following aspects should be described and analysed:

  • How many first-cycle programmes acknowledge cheating and plagiarism issues during the first academic year? Is Urkund used as early as the first or second term?
  • How many second-cycle programmes acknowledge cheating and plagiarism issues during the first academic year?
  • In how many degree courses have students been provided with detailed information on the issues with plagiarism?
  • Which teaching activities have been carried out?
  • Is information on the work with cheating and plagiarism available, and are teachers familiar with procedures?
  • How many matters have been submitted to the disciplinary board?

National regulations

Disciplinary measures can be invoked against students who use prohibited aids or other methods to attempt to mislead during examinations or other forms of assessment of study performance.[1]

The Swedish Higher Education Authority (UKÄ) divides these measures into the following categories:

  • cheat sheets and prohibited aids
  • unauthorised collaboration
  • plagiarism and fabrication
  • falsifying documents.

Plagiarism is always wrong and can be considered cheating if it is assessed to have been done consciously in order to mislead in the assessment of a study performance.

It must be made clear what the student personally produced and what has been taken (and possibly revised) from other sources. This is done by applying the correct citation and source-using technique. If a person uses another’s text verbatim, this must be done using quotes – which must be framed by quotation marks or otherwise market in a clear manner – and followed by a reference or note. Insufficient reference management can be considered cheating.

A student must also source reference their own material. If a student uses something they have written previously, for example in an essay or other course, they must include a reference to it.

Who is responsible for what?

The vice-chancellor is primarily responsible for ensuring that SLU has a long-term prevention plan for cheating and plagiarism.

The Board of Education is responsible for designing the work against cheating and plagiarism. The library, in cooperation with the Educational Development Unit (EPU) are responsible for publishing information on cheating and plagiarism on the SLU web. Programme directors of studies are responsible for spreading this information within their respective programmes.

Everyone working at SLU are obligated to follow the Higher Education Act and Higher Education Ordinance, and to work toward the objectives in the work against cheating and plagiarism. Course coordinators and examiners, especially those responsible for introductory programme courses and independent projects (degree projects) have a great operative responsibility to implement SLU work against cheating and plagiarism.

Students are obligated to carry out examination components honestly in order to enable correct and fair assessment of their study performance.

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10.2 Inform and prevent

Policy

Information on cheating and plagiarism must be conveyed in various forms to all persons affected. It must be available on relevant SLU webs, e.g. the staff, student and library web. Students and teachers must be made aware of this information at relevant times, e.g. in connection with larger student assignments, written assignments or similar.

Teaching staff should use the following tools to prevent cheating and plagiarism:

  • mindful pedagogy;
  • clear instructions for written assignments and independent projects (degree projects);
  • well thought-out examination formats.
Recurring activities

Student activities

Responsibility

Confirm that they have read the policy and action plan against cheating and plagiarism in connection with collecting their AD-login information during web registration.

Student

Publish information on cheating and plagiarism as well as how to reference properly on the SLU web. It must also be possible to use self-instruction study material on cheating and plagiarism.

The SLU library and the Educational Development Unit (EPU)

Inform all programme students during their first year on the rules for plagiarism and offer an introduction to academic honesty and references. This applies to courses at both first- and second-cycle level.

Programme directors of studies with the SLU library

Ensure that all programme students carry out a written assignment and run it through Urkund during their first academic year. The Urkund results are then discussed with the teacher.

Course coordinators, programme directors of studies

Offer specialised teaching on how to write references in combination with research strategies, source criticism and copyright in connection with SLU degree programmes.

Programme directors of studies with the SLU library

Offer individual supervision of academic writing through the Centre for Academic Language.

Library

Teach academic writing.

Course coordinator, programme directors of studies with the SLU library

Provide exchange students and other freestanding students (not studying a programme) information on plagiarism rules for relevant courses.

Course coordinator

 

Teacher activities

Responsibility

  • Teaching higher education courses
  • Grade course/lecture/teachers’ lunch/seminar
    (following requests)
  • Urkund workshops (following requests)

Unit for Educational Development (EPU)

Who is responsible for what?

  • Programme directors of studies are responsible for informing their students and teachers about this policy and action plan, and for possibly adjusting their programme subjects.
  • Course coordinators must remind their students about the policy and action plan for cheating and plagiarism, as well as special applications to current courses.
  • The SLU library and the Educational Development Unit (EPU) are responsible for information on the SLU web as well as organising joint activities.

 

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10.3 Discover and intervene

Important concepts

SLU offers special software for text matching (Urkund) to help discover cheating and plagiarism.

SLU rules

Discovering cheating

All independent projects (degree projects) at SLU must be checked for plagiarism in Urkund before receiving a pass grade. See chapter 9. Independent project (degree project)..

Any work submitted by students at SLU may be sent through Urkund for review.

Measures against cheating

If there is reason to suspect cheating or plagiarism, the head of department at the responsible department must report this to the vice-chancellor as soon as possible. The student’s conditions and the specific course requirements and prerequisites must be taken into consideration. See section 10.4 Disciplinary measures and Riktlinjer vid misstanke om fusk och andra disciplinära frågor inom utbildning vid SLU (guidelines for suspicion of cheating and other disciplinary issues relating to education at SLU – only in Swedish).

Who is responsible for what?

The examiner is responsible for ensuring that student assignments are sent to Urkund, but operative implementation normally occurs when the student delivers material to their supervisor.

If there is reason to suspect cheating, the head of department at the responsible department must report this to the vice-chancellor as soon as possible, and keep the following things in mind:

  • The examiner for the course in question must always be informed.
  • The programme director of studies in question must always be informed if the matter concerns a programme student.
  • Before reporting the matter, the faculty programme director can provide support on the matter.

Links

Urkund (tracking plagiarism)

Riktlinjer vid misstanke om fusk och andra disciplinära frågor inom utbildning vid SLU (guidelines for suspicion of cheating and other disciplinary issues relating to education at SLU – only in Swedish)

 

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10.4 Disciplinary measures 

Important concepts

Section 10.1 Cheating and plagiarism states what is considered cheating and when it can lead to disciplinary measures.

Teaching, examinations or other activities relating to education may not be disturbed. See section 3.2 Teaching environments.

The SLU equal opportunities plan states that there is zero tolerance for discrimination, harassment and other victimisation at SLU. This includes both students and employees.

National regulations

“Disciplinary measures may be invoked against students who:

  1. use prohibited aids or other methods to attempt to deceive during examinations or other forms of assessment of study performance;
  2. disrupt or obstruct teaching, tests or other activities within the framework of courses and study programmes at the higher education institution;
  3. disrupt activities in the library of the higher education institution or other separate establishments at the institution, or
  4. subject another student or member of the staff of the higher education institution to harassment or sexual harassment of the kind laid down in Section 4 of Chapter 1 of the Discrimination Act (2008:567).”[1]

“Disciplinary measures may not be invoked more than two years after the offence has been committed.”[2]

“If there are grounds for suspecting that an offence of the kind laid down in Section 1 has been committed, the vice-chancellor shall be notified promptly.”[3]

Who is responsible for what?

The head of department at the responsible department reports the matter to the vice-chancellor. Thereafter, the vice-chancellor determines whether the matter will be referred to the disciplinary board at SLU for a hearing. The disciplinary board decides on the consequences after investigating the matter and interviewing the student.

Instructions

Investigation period

When a student has been reported on the suspicion of cheating, they will not receive any grades before the matter has been decided by the vice-chancellor or disciplinary board. However, the student can participate in other examinations during the investigation period.

An examiner can fail a student even though cheating has not been proven, but they are not allowed to appeal the vice-chancellor’s assessment of the situation. Example: A student is suspected of cheating when caught with a cheat sheet before an exam. The student is subject to disciplinary consequences since there was intent to mislead. However, the student did not actually use their sheet – therefore, the offence must not affect the assessment of the exam they subsequently carried out.

Suspension period

The disciplinary measures for cheating are a warning or suspension for a maximum of six months. When suspended, a student cannot participate in examinations, lectures or other activities within the framework of their studies. In addition, they are not allowed to use university resources such as the library or IT services.

If there are scheduled exams during the suspension period, the student must wait until the next renewed examination session after the period ends.

Links

Equal opportunities at SLU

Riktlinjer vid misstanke om fusk och andra disciplinära frågor inom utbildning vid SLU (guidelines for suspicion of cheating and other disciplinary issues relating to education at SLU – only in Swedish).

Guidelines for suspected harassment of a student in accordance with the Discrimination Act

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11. Programmes offered

11.1 Degree programme objectives and requirements at SLU
11.2 Dimension degree programmes
11.3 Propose a new degree programme
11.4 Phase out a degree programme

11.1 Degree programme objectives and requirements at SLU

11.1.1 Programme profile and place in range of programmes offered

SLU objectives and requirements

All degree programmes at SLU must be connected to the university’s mission statement and areas, in accordance with government assignments. Degree programmes should complement each other and, if necessary, be available on several campuses. Doubling courses and programmes at existing SLU sites may occur if there is:

  • large student demand;
  • limited internal competition risk;
  • a clear labour market with regional connections;
  • teaching expertise to build on;
  • sustainable financial prerequisites.

In addition, SLU courses and programmes must relate to the national range of courses and programmes offered. Many of SLU’s areas of expertise compete with other universities and higher education institutions.

The annex to the Ordinance for the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences contains a complete list of all qualifications SLU offers.[1] There are two types of qualifications at SLU: professional and general. SLU may decide the qualification specialisations. General qualification specialisations are decided by the main field of study which offers progressive specialisation within the programme. See section 2.5 Subject, main field of study, disciplinary domain.

Specific requirements for certain types of programmes:

  • SLU offers three- and five-year professional programmes (exception: veterinary surgeon – 5.5 years).
  • Programmes leading to professional qualifications may also provide general qualifications if the requirements in question are met.
  • Professional qualifications do not always include specialisations.
  • All professional qualifications at second-cycle level must meet the general entry requirements for third-cycle studies at SLU.
  • Programmes leading to general qualifications may also provide professional qualifications if the requirements in question are met.

11.1.2 Student demand

SLU objectives and requirements

All SLU courses and programmes must be in demand by the students. Describing and assessing potential student interest is challenging. Student interest applies to both educational content and implementation. A clear educational structure is necessary to communicate SLU’s range of courses and programmes to prospective students. Special attention should be given to programme titles, and preparation must include some form of external perspective.

Students currently studying at SLU have important experiences which should be utilised in the development process. It also important that the university provides current students with clear information on transitional rules and other practical details.

11.1.3 Labour market demand

SLU objectives and requirements

All degree programmes at SLU should correspond to the needs of the labour market and society in general. SLU students must be prepared for a long professional life on a global labour market.

11.1.4 Resource conditions

SLU objectives and requirements

All degree programmes at SLU must have high teaching expertise. SLU’s degree programme range must be based on and advance teaching expertise at the departments (equivalent). This applies to scientific, artistic, educational and supervision expertise. Professional programmes must also include teachers’ professional expertise.

An advertised programme must be financially durable in accordance with the approved reimbursement model.

The physical and social study environment must enable students to benefit from teaching.

11.1.5 Programme content and design

SLU objectives and requirements

All degree programme at SLU must be designed to provide students with conditions to meet the qualitative targets. There must be a progression between various educational levels: “Second-cycle courses and study programmes shall involve the acquisition of specialist knowledge, competence and skills in relation to first-cycle courses and study programmes...”[2]

SLU courses and programmes must focus on student learning. They must have good links to research and society. Sustainable development, gender equality and international perspectives must be integrated in all courses and programmes.

Joint studies of different programmes may have educational and financial advantages, e.g. that students with varying experiences from several different programmes can enrich teaching of a specific course.

All programmes should have a well thought-out concept for collaboration with the sector or businesses targeted by the programme, and discuss how cooperation benefits both the course/programme and students. All degree programmes beginning at first-cycle level should include at least 15 credits (10 weeks) of placement, study trips or activities carried out somewhere other than the campus, or in cooperation with an external party. See chapter 15. External collaboration.

All degree programmes should include the possibility of exchange studies for a whole semester. Long professional programmes (5 years) must offer exchange studies (exception: qualifications that include certificates).

Specific requirements for certain types of programmes:

  • Coherent, long professional programmes (5 years) consist of a first-cycle and second-cycle level. Students must not have a first-cycle qualification to receive a professional qualification at second-cycle level, but professional qualifications at second-cycle level require that the student has carried out an independent project at first-cycle level (15 credits) and second-cycle level (30 credits) and passed both. Exceptions: Degree of Master of Science in Veterinary Medicine and Degree of Master of Science in Horticulture.
  • In order to be admitted to a second-cycle programme, students must have a Degree of Bachelor or professional qualification of at least 180 credits, or a foreign qualification.
  • Long professional programmes (5 years) at the same campus which lead to the same qualifications must be have at least 60 credits of joint content, of which at least 30 credits must be studied at the beginning of the programme.
  • All programmes which lead to professional qualifications related to the use of natural resources[3] must contain a minimum of the following:
    • 10 social science credits, e.g. economics and community planning
    • 10 technology credits, focusing on production and environmental consequences
    • 10 general technology credits, focusing on production systems.
  • First-cycle degree programmes must offer a study path with a clear progression (progressive specialisation) within the main field of study:
    • A Degree of Bachelor requires 90 main field of study credits, including an independent project (15 credits). See section 2.5 Subject, main field of study, disciplinary domain and SLU’s local qualification ordinance.
    • First-cycle programmes may include second-cycle courses, but only a maximum of 30 Degree of Bachelor credits. See SLU’s examination procedures.
    •  Degree programmes leading to a Degree of Bachelor in Biology, technology, economics or business administration must include reasonable subject-width in order to be compared to corresponding programmes at other Swedish higher education institutions and universities.
    • Degree programmes leading to a Degree of Bachelor in biology must include at least 15 credits of diversity of organisms, life processes and ecology.
    • First-cycle courses and programmes leading to a Degree of Bachelor in biology must be based on completed upper-secondary natural science education.
  • Second-cycle degree programmes must offer a study path with a clear progression (progressive specialisation) within the main field of study:
    • A Degree of Master requires 60 main field of study credits, including an independent project (30 credits). See section 2.5 Subject, main field of study, disciplinary domain and SLU’s local qualification ordinance.
    • Master’s programmes must have a study path where a minimum of 15 credits are offered during one period without other elective courses.
    • Master’s programmes must have a study path where a minimum of 15 credits consists of A1F courses within the qualification main field of study.
    • In Master’s programmes, up to 30 credits may consist of first-cycle courses. See SLU’s examination procedures.

Instructions

Within the framework of SLU’s quality assurance procedures, follow-up of objectives and requirements is done within individual courses and programmes.

Links

Degree programmes on the SLU web:

Lokal examensordning – regler för examina på grundnivå och avancerad nivå vid SLU (SLU’s examination procedures for first cycle and second-cycle level – only in Swedish). Includes teaching and research duties for SLU’s main fields of study.

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11.2 Dimension degree programmes

Educational dimensioning is primarily controlled by the following factors:

  • SLU’s funding agreement targets[1]
  • available resources and how these are allocated
  • the number of new places per programme
  • student demand.

Policy

The range of courses and programmes offered must correspond to student demand and the needs of the labour market.[2]

National regulations

SLU must report the assessments, prioritisations and needs analyses that are the basis for all course and programme range decisions.[3] SLU adjustments in regard to e.g. to allocation between programmes and courses at various levels and different entry requirements, as well as the division of campus and distance learning must be reported. In addition, a report must be made on how SLU meets the surrounding society’s need for education.

Who is responsible for what?

Educational dimensions are decided in several steps:[4]

  • Programme boards may propose dimension changes to the Board of Education.
  • The Board of Education proposes allocation of funds and funding agreement targets to the SLU Board through the vice-chancellor.
  • The SLU Board decides on allocation of funds to education at first- and second-cycle level with funding agreement targets (full-time equivalents and annual performance equivalents for degree programmes and freestanding courses).
  • The number of new places on a programme are decided within the resource framework established by the SLU Board.
  • Programme boards can decide to technically admit more students than there are places to degree programmes, within the resource frameworks established by the SLU Board.

Instructions

Annex 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning lists, among other things, joint timeframes for planning and decisions on dimensioning degree programmes.

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11.3 Propose a new degree programme

A new degree programme is a big commitment for SLU and a great responsibility, especially for the first programme students. Therefore, great care is required to analyse the conditions for and plan new programmes. Good planning is necessary when preparing and deciding on changes to the range of programmes offered. See Annex 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning.

A new degree programme must meet the requirements in section 12.1 Degree programme objectives and requirements at SLU. New programme proposals must describe, analyse and assess the aspects below as bases for a decision to create a new programme.

The items below can be used as support when developing new programmes, and for decision-making. The proposal must describe the aspects concisely, and the scope of various parts may vary depending on specific needs and prerequisites. A preliminary programme syllabus must exist when establishing a new programme.

SLU may be jointly responsible for a programme with other higher education institutions, and create joint examinations. There are specific guidelines for joint programmes and joint degrees, which state the exceptions and agreements required in such cases. See Links below.

11.3.1 Programme profile and place in range of programmes offered

What must the proposal include?
  • Which SLU field(s)[1] are affected and how? How is the programme’s unique profile expressed?
  • Are other SLU programmes or courses related to the field? Justify why the programme is needed in relation to SLU’s joint range of programmes offered. Report any overlaps with other SLU programmes or courses and possible risks of competition with other programmes. Clarify if another programme will be phased out if the proposed programme is approved.
  • Are there similar, competing programmes at other higher education institutions? Benchmark the programme in question against these programmes. Justify why the degree programme is necessary in relation to the national range of courses and programmes offered. Do other countries have similar programmes?
  • Which qualification does the programme provide, and what other qualifications must students have to study the programme in question? If related to general qualifications, the analysis must be connected to a main field of study. If an existing main field of study will be used, justify why. If so, also state the other programmes using the main field of study in question, and how the programmes will complement, not compete with, each other. If a new main field of study will be used, justify why. See section 2.5 Subject, main field of study, disciplinary domain.
  • If the Board of Education must create a new qualification descriptor, a proposal description must be included in the report. In addition, the SLU programme syllabus template must be used.

11.3.2 Student demand

What must the proposal include?
  • What is the programme student target group? Does the programme correspond to their areas of interest?
  • Does the programme title correspond to its content, and is the title relevant to the target group?
  • Report how demand has been met, implemented and planned target groups analyses, focus groups, benchmarking against other programmes, etc.
  • What are the planned programme entry requirements? How do they affect the potential target group scope?
  • How will the programme be marketed? Report completed and/or planned information and marketing initiatives. In addition, how will student recruitment be designed?
  • Report how student influence has been implemented and utilised in the development work.

11.3.3 Labour market demand

What must the proposal include?
  • Which type of labour market does the programme lead to? Report an analysis of current and future societal needs for persons with the proposed type of education. The analysis must be as quantitative as possible.
  • Which skills relevant to a national and international labour market will students develop during their studies?
  • Report how viewpoints, requests and proposals from labour market stakeholders within related business and public sectors have been collected and utilised in the development work.
  • Report how consumer viewpoints on the programme will be utilised in future programme development and when dimensioning the programme.

11.3.4 Resource conditions

What must the proposal include?
  • Which teaching resources are available on the programme? Report access to those employed for an indefinite period (stability and long-term sustainability), scientifically/artistically skilled persons, persons with higher education and experienced teachers as well as other employees who will take part of the programme in some way.
  • Are programme needs relating to subject and educational teaching expertise covered at SLU, or do new teachers need to be recruited or is cooperation with other higher education institutions necessary? Where applicable, report which parts of SLU or other higher education institutions will take part of the programme, and how. Report if future, planned external partners have been contacted.
  • The necessary planned programme infrastructure must also be described and assessed in relation to existing resources. Describe if necessary premises or equipment are needed – both joint and programme-specific infrastructure.
  • Is it possible to make resources more effective through joint studying or other joint resource usage, e.g. with the aid of digitalisation and distance learning? If so, how and how much?

11.3.5 Programme content and design

What must the proposal include?
Degree outcomes and progression
  • Enclose a preliminary course schedule describing the programme’s basic design and content.
  • Describe how the programme’s design and examinations contribute to student learning.
  • Describe how students are ensured to meet the qualitative targets. . The matrix model[2] below can be used to describe how programme courses relate to qualitative targets and how a programme is planned to ensure student progression in regard to subject-specific and general skills.
  • Report and justify possible joint studies with existing programmes/courses.
  • Describe how students will be able to subsequently study at second- or third-cycle level after completing the programme.
  • If a new main field of study is needed, see section 2.5 Subject, main field of study, disciplinary domain.

Matrix model: A matrix is made for each programme, displaying how qualitative targets will be met through the planned programme courses. The matrix includes the qualitative targets on one axis and included courses on the other axis. The interface lists relevant intended course learning outcomes that contribute to meeting the qualitative targets in question. The model clarifies how a programme is designed and how it will progress in a clear way, and must take both subject-specific and general skills into consideration.

Programme

Degree outcome 1

Degree outcome 2

Degree outcome 3, etc.

Course code:
Course title A

 

Intended learning outcome 1 + 3

 

Course code:
Course title B

Intended learning outcome 3

 

Intended learning outcome 2

Course code:
Course title C

Intended learning outcome 4

Intended learning outcome 1 + 6

 

Course code:
Course title D etc.

 

 

Intended learning outcome 5, etc.

 

Research connection
  • Describe how the programme will achieve a good research basis.
  • Describe how students will take part of research-connected activities which enable a scientific approach.
Societal and professional connection
  • Describe how and when during their studies that students will develop skills relevant to a national and international labour market.
  • Report any planned labour market participation and the forms for such cooperation during the programme period. This may for example include placements, field studies, visiting lecturers an independent projects. See chapter 15. External collaboration. If placement is compulsory, describe how students are assured to get access to it.
Sustainable development perspective
  • Describe how the programme provides students with a solid foundation for managing all perspectives (financial, social, environmental) of sustainability in their future professional life.
Gender equality perspective
  • Describe how the programme includes a gender and gender equality perspective in its content and implementation.
International perspective
  • Describe how the programme includes international relationships in its content and implementation. Are student and teacher exchanges possible?

11.3.6 Consequence summary

What must the proposal include?
  • Describe the expected consequences for stakeholders if the new degree programme proposal is approved.
  • Summarise possible adjustments to the various objectives that are the bases for the proposal.
  • Describe how many students can take the programme and how many students are necessary for the programme to meet its resource needs.
  • Enclose a programme syllabus proposal. See section 6.2 Course syllabus

Who is responsible for what?

Activity

Degree programme

Proposal

Department, programme board or faculty board

Approve/reject

Programme board, faculty board and Board of Education[3]

Decision to set up

SLU Board[4]

Decision on programme syllabus

Board of Education[5]

Instructions

Annex 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning includes, among other things, joint timeframes for planning and decisions on range of programmes and courses offered. Changes to the range of programmes and courses offered should be prepared in parallel at faculty and university level. When developing a new programme, relevant programme syllabus information is compiled during various preparation phases. This means that a programme syllabus can be established in connection with the SLU Board’s decision to implement a new programme.

Links

Antagningsordning för tillträde till utbildning på grundnivå och avancerad nivå (Admission regulations for access to the first- and second-cycle education – only in Swedish) as of August 1 2015.

Lokal examensordning – regler för examina på grundnivå och avancerad nivå vid SLU (SLU’s examination procedures for first cycle and second cycle level – only in Swedish). Includes teaching and research duties for SLU’s main fields of study.

Riktlinjer för gemensam examen vid SLU (guidelines for joint degrees at SLU – only in Swedish)


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11.4 Phase out a degree programme

Policy

Degree programmes which no longer meet labour market needs, do not attract enough students or do not meet quality requirements must either be developed or phased out. Before deciding whether to phase out (cancel) a programme, the programme board must draw up measures which enable students who have already been admitted to complete their studies.

Phasing out a degree programme requires gradual adjustment regarding current (already admitted) programme students. The programme board is responsible for students who study a programme at a normal pace of study. In addition, students who have taken approved leave from studies with a guaranteed place, and students with disabilities who may have the right to an adjusted pace of study, must be taken into consideration.

National regulations

Transitional rules must be approved in connection with the decision to phase out a degree programme. See section 6.2 Course syllabus.

SLU rules

There must be a plan regarding how to communicate the changes to the students in question. When applicable, this also applies to temporary freeze on admissions.

Who is responsible for what?

Division of responsibility is the same as when a programme is created. See section 12.3 Propose a new degree programme. The faculty office supporting the responsible programme board is responsible for informing affected students according to the instructions below.

Instructions

When a degree programme is cancelled, affected students (all admitted students who have not received a qualification from the programme in question) must be informed in writing (paper-based mail).

Annex 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning includes, among other things, joint timeframes for planning and decisions on range of programmes and courses offered, including the cancellation of a programme. Changes to the range of programmes and courses offered should be prepared in parallel at faculty and university level.

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12. Programme syllabus and programme date

12.1 Programme syllabus
12.2 Programme date
12.3 Temporary freeze on admissions

12.1 Programme syllabus

National regulations

The Higher Education Ordinance contains course and programme regulations:[1]

  • “Curses may be combined to create study programmes.
  • A study programme shall have a programme syllabus.
  • The programme syllabus shall indicate the courses that the study programme comprises, specific entry requirements and other regulations required.”

SLU rules

SLU follows the recommendations for programme syllabuses issued by SUHF (the Association of Swedish Higher Education):[2]

Programme syllabuses must state:

-       the courses included in the degree programme;

-       the main structure of the degree programme;

-       the prior knowledge requirements and other stipulations other than general entry requirements that apply in order to be admitted to the degree programme (specific entry requirements);

-       when the programme syllabus or changes to it will apply and the necessary transitional regulations and rules.

The following applies to programme syllabuses for degree programmes at first-cycle and second-cycle level at SLU:

  • One programme syllabus comprises one degree programme.
  • Prior knowledge requirements (specific entry requirements) in order to be admitted to the programme must be listed.
  • Degree programme objectives must be listed.
  • The content and structure of the programme must be stated. The schematic overview must contain the programme courses and their level, specialisation, main field of study and scope. Professional programmes must state whether the courses are compulsory.
  • The specific requirements needed in order to receive a certain qualification must be listed. They must be connected to the document Lokal examensordning – regler för examina på grundnivå och avancerad nivå vid SLU (SLU’s examination procedures for first cycle and second cycle level – only in Swedish), which contains internal qualification regulations.
  • A preliminary programme syllabus must exist when establishing a new degree programme.
  • Programme syllabuses for new degree programmes are approved by the SLU Board of Education.[3] See Annex 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning.
  • The Board of Education has delegated decisions regarding certain revision of existing programme syllabuses to the programme board in question. See Who is responsible for what? and Annex 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning.
  • Swedish must be used by public authorities in Sweden. Therefore, programme syllabuses must be written in Swedish.[4] There must be an English translation to put into the course database.
Headings in an SLU programme syllabus

Programme syllabus for the xx programme, xx credits
(Syllabus for the xxx Programme, xx credits)

  • The decision must contain the programme code, decision date, approving board, starting date, responsible programme board, ID number, etc.
  • Prior knowledge and other entry requirements
  • Objective
  • Qualification
  • Content and structure (schematic overview)
  • Transitional provisions and other regulations
  • Other information
  • The Board of Education approves programme syllabuses.[5]
  • The programme board decides on certain programme syllabus revisions.

Who is responsible for what?

The headings “Content and structure”, “Transitional provisions and other regulations” as well as “Other information” may be revised by the programme board in question, if the task has been delegated by the Board of Education.

Instructions

Annex 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning includes, among other things, joint timeframes for planning and decisions on programme syllabuses. Also see the instructions for programme syllabuses under Links for more information.

Developing a programme title

In regard to programmes that lead to a professional qualification, the programme title is based on the qualification title (e.g. Forest Management – Bachelor’s programme).

Programmes that lead to a general qualification base their titles on a content concept with a last element that states the qualification type (e.g. Ethology and Animal Welfare – Bachelor's programme, Sustainable Food Systems – Master’s programme).

Official documents include the established and complete programme title the first time. In the rest of the text, a more flexible formulation can be used in uniform way (e.g. the Bachelor’s programme Ethology and Animal Welfare, the Master’s programme Sustainable Food Systems). Descriptive text should list the programme title in the programme language.

Programme codes
  • The SLU Board approves a new programme → the Board of Education decides on a new programme syllabus → new programme code in Slukurs. See section 12.3 Propose a new degree programme.
  • The SLU Board cancels a programme → the programme code is stored in Slukurs. See section 12.4 Phase out a degree programme.
  • The Board of Education decides on a new programme syllabus for an existing programme → new programme syllabus version → existing programme code is kept, but gets a new version addendum.
  • The programme board decides on a new programme syllabus for an existing programme → new programme syllabus version → existing programme code is kept, but the course syllabus gets a new version addendum.

The faculty office or other unit that support the body that decides on the programme syllabus in question is responsible for submitting the approved syllabus for archiving.

Links

Instructions for programme syllabuses
Programme syllabus template – Swedish (Word)
Programme syllabus template – English (Word)
Lokal examensordning – regler för examina på grundnivå och avancerad nivå vid SLU (SLU’s examination procedures for first cycle and second cycle level – only in Swedish) includes teaching and research duties for SLU’s main fields of study.


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12.2 Programme date

Important concepts

A programme date is a programme period and start date.

Policy

Potential students must be provided with information in good time. Therefore, both the programme syllabus and programme date must be decided in good time before the application period begins.

SLU rules

A decision of which degree programme will be available for the coming academic year must be made by 1 July.

Who is responsible for what?

The SLU Board annually decides on the range of degree programmes offered at first- and second-cycle level.[1]

Instructions

Annex 2: Annual cycle for course and programme planning includes, among other things, joint timeframes for planning and decisions on range of programmes and courses offered.

Links

Degree programmes on the SLU web:

 

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12.3 Temporary freeze on admissions

SLU rules

Any changes to the announced programme offering must be done before admission is carried out for the subsequent semester. Currently, decisions regarding the cancellation of a programme must be made not later than:

  • 1 March for second-cycle programmes that are taught in English and start in the autumn semester;
  • 1 June for other degree programmes that start in the autumn semester, and
  • 15 November for other degree programmes that start in the spring semester.

Who is responsible for what?

The vice-chancellor decides whether to cancel an announced degree programme.[1]

 
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13. Programme studies

13.1 Anmälan till program (programtillfälle)
13.2 Antagning till program (programtillfälle)
13.3 Registrering på program (programtillfälle)
13.4 Antagning till senare del av program
13.5 Studieuppehåll och avbrott på program
13.6 Förändringar i kursutbudet inom program
13.7 Programstudierektor

13.1 Programme application (programme date)

National regulations

“A person seeking admission to first or second-cycle higher education shall apply within the time prescribed and in compliance with the procedures laid down by the higher education institution.”[1]

The Swedish Agency for Higher Education Services (UHR) coordinates higher education applications in Sweden. The application deadline for each semester can be found at www.antagning.se and www.universityadmissions.se.

Applications can be made at:

·         antagning.se or

·         www.universityadmissions.se

Links

Application and admission

Tillbaka till kapitlets början

13.2 Programme admission (programme date)

National regulations

“Any specific entry requirements imposed shall be totally essential for a student to be able to benefit from the course or study programme.”[1]

“If special grounds exist, a higher education institution may decide to waive one or more entry requirements. A higher education institution shall waive one or more entry requirements if the applicant has the capacity to benefit from the course or study programme without meeting the entry requirements.”[2]

SLU rules

Entry requirement assessment

Antagningsordning för tillträde till utbildning på grundnivå och avancerad nivå (admission regulations for first- and second-cycle education – only in Swedish) regulate access to courses and programmes at first- and second-cycle level.

Admission decision

The applicant receives an email saying that their admission decision is available under “My Pages” at www.antagning.se.

If the applicant must reply to the admission decision, the decision must include:

·         a deadline;

·         if the applicant must answer via www.antagning.se or in another way.

An applicant who has been admitted to a programme and accepted their place, but who does not intend to take the programme, must decline as soon as possible under “My pages” at www.antagning.se.

Admission from waiting list

Under “My pages” at www.antagning.se, a student can see if they are on the waiting list. After receiving an offer to study the programme, the student must reply within 24 hours.

Who is responsible for what?

The student must:

·         apply before the set deadline;

·         accept or decline their place (within 24 hours for admission from waiting list).

The head of admissions decides on[3]:

·         admission to first- and second-cycle education;

·         entry requirement exemptions.

Instructions

SLU follows the guidelines applied by the Swedish Agency for Higher Education Services’ (UHR) regarding application and admission, as well as the Association of Swedish Higher Education’s (SUHF) recommendations within the field.

Links

Antagningsordning för tillträde till utbildning på grundnivå och avancerad nivå (admission regulations for access to the first- and second-cycle education – only in Swedish) as of August 1 2015.
Application and admission
www.antagning.se
www.universityadmissions.se

Tillbaka till kapitlets början

13.3 Programme registration (programme date)

Important concepts

By registering, the student confirms that they accept their place on the course.

SLU rules

Registration

Students can register themselves on a programme by registering to take the introductory programme course. Currently, the following applies to registration:

  • First-cycle programmes: The student must be present during roll-call and is then registered on the first course and programme.
  • Second-cycle programmes: The student is offered to register themselves on a course. By registering on the first course, the student confirms that they accept their place on the programme.
Lost programme place

A student who does not attend when the programme starts may lose their place, unless they have notified the Division of Educational Affairs beforehand stating why they cannot attend. Special reasons are defined in more detail in section 8.6 Special reasons.

Late start to a programme

A student can begin studying a programme after it has begun if they still have a place. However, this must occur no later than two (2) weeks after the programme starts.

Who is responsible for what?

The head of admissions, in consultation with the programme director of studies in question, decides:

  • if a student will lose their place on a programme;
  • how late a student is allowed to begin studying a programme after it starts – however, it must be no later than two (2) weeks after the programme starts.

Tillbaka till kapitlets början

13.4 Admission to latter parts of programmes

SLU rules

SLU allows admission to the latter part of programmes. The programme board decides on exemptions for specific programmes.

A student can be admitted to latter parts of degree programmes before the second semester at the earliest, provided there is space.

Application

Applications must be for a specific semester and year. The applicant’s previous studies govern which programme semester they are admitted to.

Requirements

SLU’s admission regulations govern requirements.

Available places

The number of available places per year is established by the programme board in question before every application period.

Selection

In accordance with SLU’s admission regulations, the programme board in question can decide on more detailed ranking and selection guidelines.

Appeals

If a student has been rejected for a latter part of a programme because there are no available places, they cannot appeal.

A decision stating that an applicant does not meet the entry requirements can be appealed.

Who is responsible for what?

The responsible programme board decides on admission to latter parts of a programme.[1] This decision may be delegated.

Instructions

There is more information on how admission to latter parts takes place on the student web (see link below). The applicant must use a special application form which is then submitted to the registrar in question.

SLU announces a period in which prospective students can submit applications before each autumn and spring semester, respectively.

The body which decides on these matters must also archive:

  • applications for the latter part of programmes, and
  • decisions regarding admission to the latter part of a programme (archived permanently).

Links

Admissions to latter part of programmes

Tillbaka till kapitlets början

13.5 Approved leave from studies and non-completion of a programme

See section 3.13 Approved leave from studies and non-completion.

13.6 Changes to the range of courses offered within a programme

SLU rules

The range of courses offered within a programme is revised over time, but the programme board in question is responsible for giving students the possibility to complete their studies in accordance with the programme syllabus objectives in question. Changes to the range of courses offered within a programme are announced in the form of a revised programme syllabus. See section 12.1 Programme syllabus.

Certain changes can be added directly to a programme syllabus. Other changes to a degree programme require gradual adjustment regarding already admitted programme students. See the instructions for programme syllabuses under Links for more information.

The programme board is responsible for students who study a programme at a normal pace of study. In addition, students who have taken approved leave from studies with a guaranteed place, and students with disabilities who may have the right to an adjusted pace of study, must be taken into consideration.

For more information on the phasing out of a degree programme, see section 11.4 Phase out a degree programme.

Links

Instructions for programme syllabuses
Programme syllabus template – Swedish (Word)
Programme syllabus template – English (Word)

Tillbaka till kapitlets början

13.7 Programme director of studies

Important concepts

Programme directors of studies have a general responsibility for one or several degree programmes. The tasks of programme directors of studies are defined in the vice-chancellor’s delegation of authority. See Delegations of authority.

Who is responsible for what?

The responsible programme board appoints programme directors of studies for degree programmes.[1]

Instructions

Contact information for programme directors of studies must be available in connection with the programme descriptions on the SLU web. The faculty office supporting the programme director of studies in question is responsible for making contact information available.

Links

Contact information for programme directors of studies can be found on the student web programme pages:

 

Tillbaka till kapitlets början

Tillbaka till dokumentets början

14. Credit transfer

See Tillgodoräknandeordning för utbildning på grund- och avancerad nivå (credit transfer procedures for first-cycle and second-cycle education).

 

Tillbaka till dokumentets början

15. External collaboration 

15.1 External collaboration
15.2 External collaboration purpose and objectives
15.3 Education planning – external collaboration
15.4 External collaboration and student progression
15.5 External collaboration for good working life connections (teachers)
15.6 Follow-up

15.1 External collaboration

Important concepts

External collaboration is a means or a process that requires two or more parties to achieve a common goal that it would not have been possible for them to achieve on their own. SLU’s external collaboration partners can be national or international. Systemic educational collaboration activities should be planned focusing on joint objectives and both parties’ conditions.

Who is responsible for what?

The programme boards are generally responsible for educational collaboration, and it can be planned in the following way:      

15.2 External collaboration purpose and objectives

The responsible programme board must state the students’ intended learning outcomes, educational quality objectives and other collaboration objectives.

The degree programme’s external collaboration objectives should be listed. How does collaboration benefit the programme? Does it focus on student employability and day-one skills, and/or educational quality in general? According to programme and business representatives, which expertise and skills are completely necessary for students to learn?

15.3 Education planning – external collaboration

SLU’s external collaboration partners should be given a real opportunity to take part of educational planning.

Collaborating with working life representatives when planning a programme, course or teaching can contribute to better preparing students for their future working lives. It can also give future employers an insight into the education process and possible parts of research. To reduce dependence on personal contacts, business clusters, alumni and industry organisations can be used, as well as organised systematic collaboration (e.g. programme board or industry council participation) (equivalent).

When a course or a programme is revised, external reference groups should be given the opportunity to provide viewpoints. External viewpoints must also be included when deciding on the dimension of a course or programme.

15.4 External collaboration and student progression 

External collaboration activities and their intended learning outcomes must gradually become more complex for students on a course or programme. Professional contacts must be made available to students even if they decide not to take an optional placement course.

External collaboration can be organised into individual courses such as placement or project courses, seminar series or course components. Courses should be divided into appropriate years. In addition, external collaboration objectives and content should be listed in course syllabuses.

External collaboration progression can mean introducing professional contacts early during a course or programme and subsequently deepening and integrating them in teaching activities. Ultimately, a student can then use their learned skills and knowledge at a company, within an organisation, public authority or in a similar, realistic context. Higher progression may mean increased student activity requirements and more actively involved students. An example of a model with an increased complexity degree involves study visits, guest lectures, cases/assignments and more “concentrated” external collaboration projects.

The choice of components and collaborations forms should be governed and justified based on the intended learning outcomes and conditions of the specific course or programme and industry that it specialises in.

External collaboration activities should complement the students’ unions’ business and labour market days or mentor programmes.

15.5 External collaboration for good working life connections (teachers) 

Through collaboration, teachers should be given the opportunity to stay updated about relationships and conditions for an external working life.

Working life involves many changes, and it can be difficult for teachers to have current knowledge of which skills are in demand in the private sector. In order for courses and programmes to be relevant to society and current, various forms of external collaboration can make e.g. teacher study visits, teacher exchange, adjunct teachers, externally employed senior lectureships, etc. possible, which can contribute to connect teaching to the current labour market.

15.6 Follow-up

Follow-up of the external collaboration objectives must be done from the course or programme’s, students’ and external partners’ perspective.

The university is responsible for maintaining good teaching quality from a student perspective. Collaboration activity qualities can be followed up through e.g. course evaluations and examinations. Special focus should lie on how relevant the collaboration components are to the students.

Course or programme collaboration can be clarified and followed up through systematic documentation of the external collaboration activities, for example in a digital skills portfolio.

It is in SLU’s interest that our external partners are satisfied and wish to continue collaborating with us. Therefore, follow-up of the joint objectives for external collaboration must be carried out, or supported, by SLU, even if it partly lies outside the university’s assignment. 

Tillbaka till dokumentets början

Bilageförteckning

Bilaga 1: SLU:s utbildningsorganisation
Bilaga 2: Årscykel för utbildningsplanering
Bilaga 3: Ämnen vid SLU inom utbildning på grundnivå och avancerad nivå
Bilaga 4: Arkivering av kursinformation - se Vad ska bevaras? på webbsidan Hantera dokumentation
Bilaga 5: Gemensamma kursvärderingsfrågor (Evald)
Bilaga 6: Gemensamma kursvärderingsfrågor (Evald) för självständigt arbete (examensarbete)
Bilaga 7: Uppgifter som ska ingå i framsida och titelsida för självständigt arbete (examensarbete) vid SLU
Bilaga 8: Avpubliceringsprocess för pdf-fil som redan är publicerad i Epsilon
Bilaga 9: Process vid förändring av pdf-fil som redan är publicerad i Epsilon 

 

 

[1] Högskolelagen (1992:1434) 1 kap. 2 §, 1 pkt

[2] Högskolelagen (1992:1434) 1 kap. 7 §

[3] Riktlinjer för resursfördelning till utbildning på grundnivå och avancerad nivå (SLU ID: SLU.ua 2017.1.1.1-3249)

[4] Utbildningsnämndens beslut 2017-10-11 (§ 57/17)

[5] Resursfördelningsmodell, utbildningsnämndens beslut 2017-05-17 (§ 31/17)

[6] För 2018 är X = 10 250 kr. Beloppet räknas årligen upp med pris- och löneomräkning (PLO).

[7] Resursfördelningsmodell, utbildningsnämndens beslut 2017-05-17 (§ 31/17)

[8] Resursfördelningsmodell, utbildningsnämndens beslut 2017-05-17 (§ 31/17)

[9] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 6 kap. 2 §

[10] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[11] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[12] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 1 kap. 4 §

[13] Förordning (2001:526) om de statliga myndigheternas ansvar för genomförandet av handikappolitiken

[14] Diskrimineringslagen (2008:567)

[15] Diskrimineringslagen (2008:567) 2 kap. 5 §

[16] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 6 kap. 3 §

[17] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 1 kap. 11 §

[18] Offentlighets- och sekretesslagen (2009:400) 23 kap. 5 §

[19] Förordning (2010:543) om anmälningsavgift och studieavgift vid universitet och högskolor

[20] Förordning (2010:543) om anmälningsavgift och studieavgift vid universitet och högskolor, 6 §

[21] SUHF:s rekommendationer 2011-4 och 2012:1

[22] Se avsnitt 1.6 Ämne, huvudområde, utbildningsområde.

[23] Se avsnitt 1.6 Ämne, huvudområde, utbildningsområde.

[24] Universitetsadministrationens delegationsordning

[25] Förordning (2010:543) om anmälningsavgift och studieavgift vid universitet och högskolor, § 10

[26] Förordning (2010:718) om stipendier till avgiftsskyldiga studenter

[27] Högskoleförordningen (193:100) 7 kap. 33 §

[28] UHR:s föreskrifter 2016:1, 1a §

[29] UHR:s föreskrifter 2013:3, 2 §

[30] UHR:s föreskrifter 2016:1, 4 §

[31] UHR:s föreskrifter 2013:3, 5 §

[32] Högskolelagen (1992:1434) 1 kap. 4 a §

[33] Högskolelagen (1992:1434) 2 kap. 7 §

[34] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 2 kap. 14 §

[35] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 2 kap. 14 §

[36] Förordningen (1993:221) för SLU 2 kap. 2 §

[37] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 10 kap. 4 §

[38] Högskolelagen (1992:1434) 2 kap. 7−8 §

[39] Studentkårsförordningen (2009:769) 7 §

[40] SLU:s regler för uppdragstillägg, arvoden och ersättningar

[41] Suppleanter har rätt till arvode när de ersätter en ordinarie ledamot.

[42] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 12 kap. 2 §

[43] Anställningsordning för SLU

[44] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[45] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 6 kap. 18 §

[46] Förordningen (1993:221) för SLU 5 kap. 3 a §

[47] Rektors delegationsordning

[48] Se avsnitt Excellenta lärare 4.4 Examinationsrätt på institutionsnivå.

[49] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 6 kap. 22 §

[50] Myndighetsförordningen (2007:515)

[51] Högskolelagen (1992:1434 ) 1 kap. 4 §

[52] Rektorsbeslut 2016-12-21 (SLU ID: SLU.ua 2016.1.1.2-4643)

[53] Rektorsbeslut 2018-02-27 (SLU ID: SLU.ua 2018.1.1.2-501)

[54] Ramverk för kvalitetsarbete inom SLU:s utbildningar

[55] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 1 kap. 14 §

[56] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 1 kap. 14 §

[57] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[58] Rektors delegationsordning

[59] Universitetsadministrationens delegationsordning

[60] Rektors delegationsordning

[61] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 6 kap. 14–15 §§

[62] Tillhör formellt inte kursplanen, men visas i ihop med kursplanen.

[63] För närvarande är hippologprogrammet och veterinärprogrammet undantagna.

[64] Högskoleförordningen(1993:100) 7 kap. 8 §

[65] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[66] Rektors delegationsordning

[67] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 6 kap. 18 §

[68] Utbildningsnämndens beslut § 77/17

[69] Utbildningsnämndens beslut § 59/15

[70] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 7 kap. 4 §

[71] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 7 kap. 8 §

[72] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 7 kap. 3 §

[73] Universitetsadministrationens delegationsordning

[74] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 6 kap. 18 §

[75] Förvaltningslagen (2017:900) 37 §

[76] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 6 kap. 23 §

[77] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 12 kap. 2 §

[78] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 6 kap. 24 §

[79] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 6 kap. 21 §

[80] Övergångsregler

ska föras in i kursplanen för en kurs som läggs ned

ska föras in i kursplanen för en kurs som revideras

kan föras in i kursplanen för en ny kurs som ersätter en tidigare

[81] Förordningen (1993:221) för SLU

[82] Gemensamma kursplaner för självständigt arbete, utbildningsnämndens beslut 2017-05-17 (SLU ID: SLU ua 2017.3.1.1-2294)

[83] Ny utbildningsplan för veterinärprogrammet, utbildningsnämndens beslut 2016-10-12 (SLU ID: SLU ua 2016.3.1.1-3818)

[84] Självständiga arbeten, utbildningsnämndens beslut 2017-12-13 (SLU ID: SLU.ua 2017.1.1.1-4818)

[85] Gemensamma kursplaner för självständigt arbete, utbildningsnämndens beslut 2017-05-17 (SLU ID: SLU ua 2017.3.1.1-2294)

[86] Självständiga arbeten, utbildningsnämndens beslut 2017-09-06 § 47/17 (SLU ID: SLU ua 2017.1.1.1-3635)

[87] Universitetsdirektörens beslut 2018-06-12 (SLU ID: SLU ua 2018.2.1.2-1923)

[88] Strategi för bevarande av elektroniska handlingar (dnr SLU.ua.2016.2.1.2-1990-2)

[89] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 10 kap. 1 §

[90] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 10 kap. 1 §

[91] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 10 kap. 1 §

[92] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 10 kap. 9 §

[93] Förordningen (1993:221) för SLU

[94] Högskolelagen (1992:1434) 1 kap. § 9

[95] Agronom, hortonom, jägmästare, lantmästare, skogsmästare och trädgårdsingenjör.

[96] Formuleras i SLU:s regleringsbrev från regeringen.

[97] SLU:s regleringsbrev och SLU:s strategi

[98] SLU:s regleringsbrev

[99] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[100] Verksamhetsområden enligt definition i styrelsens delegationsordning.

[101] Baserad på underlag från bland annat Luleå tekniska universitet och Umeå universitet.

[102] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[103] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[104] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[105] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 6 kap. 13, 16-17 §§

[106] SUHF:s rekommendation 2011:1 (dnr 10/118)

[107] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[108] Språklagen (2009:600) 10 §

[109] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[110] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[111] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[112] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 7 kap. § 4

[113] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 7 kap. 8 §

[114] Högskoleförordningen (1993:100) 7 kap. 3 §

[115] Enligt antagningsordningen beslutar rektor i antagningsfrågor. Rektor har dock delegerat den befogenheten vidare. Enligt universitetsadministrationens delegationsordning är det antagningschefen vid utbildningsavdelningen som beslutar i antagningsfrågor, förutom vid senare antagning till program – då beslutar en programnämnd.

[116] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[117] Styrelsens delegationsordning

[118] Styrelsens delegationsordning (SLU ID: SLU.ua.2018.1.1.1-561)

[119] Utbildningsnämndens beslut 2018-05-17 (§ 36/18)

[120] Inom ämnen som utgör huvudområden erbjuder SLU en successiv fördjupning som möjlig­gör generella examina. För huvudområdena finns ämnesbeskrivningar i bilagan till Lokal examensordning – regler för examina på grundnivå och avancerad nivå vid SLU.

[121] Varje ämne är kategoriserat i ett utbildningsområde. Följande utbildningsområden finns vid SLU:

DE – design

ME – medicin

NA – naturvetenskap

SA – samhällsvetenskap

TE – teknikvetenskap

VÅ – vård

ÖV – övrigt område

Tillbaka till dokumentets början

13.1 Programme application (programme date)

National regulations

“A person seeking admission to first or second-cycle higher education shall apply within the time prescribed and in compliance with the procedures laid down by the higher education institution.”[1]

The Swedish Agency for Higher Education Services (UHR) coordinates higher education applications in Sweden. The application deadline for each semester can be found at www.antagning.se and www.universityadmissions.se.

Applications can be made at:

·         antagning.se or

·         www.universityadmissions.se

Links

Application and admission



[1] Higher Education Act (1993:100) Chapter 7, Section 4.

 

Page editor: Johan.Toren@slu.se